Professor
Ph.D., University of Florida
B.S., Northwestern University

Profile

kelly_1_

Dr. Kelly is interested in developing the interface between clinical and social psychology. More specifically, she studies secrecy, self-disclosure, and self-presentation in psychotherapy and everyday interactions.

As a Kaneb Teaching Fellow,she is committed to helping college students understand and improve their interactions with professors. 

Recent Publications (*Denotes Graduate Student Author **Denotes Undergraudate Student Author)

Kelly, A. E. (2010). The Clever Student: A guide to getting the most from your professors. Corby Books.
 
Kelly, A. E. (in press). Feedback from confidants can be accepted more readily following believable disclosures. In R. Sutton & P. Lang (Eds.), The handbook of criticism, praise, and advice.
 
Kelly, A. E., & Macr eady , D. E.* (2009). Why disclosing to a confidant can be so good (or bad) for us. In W. & T. Afifi (Eds.), Uncertainty and information regulation in interpersonal contexts: Theories and applications (pp. 384-402). New York: Routledge.
 
Cummins, L. F.**, Nador ff, M. N.**, & Kelly, A. E. (2009). Winning and positive affect can lead to reckless gambling. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 23, 287-294.
 
Kelly, A. E., & Yuan , K. H. (2009). Clients’ secret-keeping and the working alliance inadult outpatient ther apy. Psychotherapy Theory, Research, Practice, Training, 46, 193-202.
 
Rycyna, C. C.**, Champion , C. D.*, & Kelly , A. E. (2009). First impressions after various types of deception: Less favorable following expectancy violation. Basic and Applied Social Psychology , 31, 40-48.
 
Yip, J. J.*, & Kelly, A. E. (2008). Can emotional disclosure lead to increased self-reported neuroticism? Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, 27, 761-778.
 
Kelly, A. E., & Rodriguez, R. R.* (2007). Do therapists disclose more to clients with greatersymptomatology? Psychotherapy Theory, Research, Practice, Training, 44, 470-475. 
 
Kelly, A. E., & Yip, J. J.* (2006). Is keeping a secret or being a secretive person linked to psychological symptoms? Journal of Personality, 74, 1349-1369.
 
Kelly, A. E., & Rodriguez, R. R.* (2006). Publicly committing oneself to an identity. Basic and Applied Social Psychology, 28, 185-191.
 
 

Contact Information
Office: 218B Haggar Hall
Notre Dame, Indiana 46556
Phone: (574) 631-7048
Email: akelly@nd.edu