News

Psychologist examines methods of classifying mental disorders

Lee Anna Clark Feature
Dr. Lee Anna Clark
https://news.nd.edu/news/psychologist-examines-methods-of-classifying-mental-disorders/
Understanding Mental Disorder through a Scientific Lens: 
“One of the main things that we kept coming back to is the idea that ‘having a mental disorder’ is very different from having the measles or even something like diabetes – and it can be helpful to think about mental disorder psychopathology in this more complex way,” says Clark. “While there definitely are treatments and ways to help people deal with mental disorders, there aren’t any magic bullets.”

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Healing Words, Healing Work: Supporting Recovery from Child Abuse and Neglect - Kristin Valentino

Child abuse and neglect leads to destructive behavioral and physical health problems among millions of children each year. This talk addresses how to support recovery from child abuse and neglect through the strengthening of parent-child relationships. You can view Kristin Valentino's Saturday Scholar lecture video here, and on the Arts and Letters YouTube channel:

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Dr. Lee Anna Clark wins 2017 Joseph Zubin Award

Lee Anna AwardDr. Lee Anna Clark wins 2017 Joseph Zubin Award

Congratulations, Lee Anna!

Dr. Lee Anna Clark, William J. & Dorothy K. O'Neill Professor of Psychology, Co-Director of the Center for Advanced Measurement of Personality & Psychopathology, and Psychology Department Chair, has been awarded the 2017 Joseph Zubin Award by the Society for Research in Psychopathology. The Zubin Award is given for lifetime contributions to the understanding of psychopathology. Pictured here is Professor Clark (right) with Sheri Johnson, past president of the Society, receiving her award at the 31st Annual Meeting of the Society for Research in Psychopathology in Denver, Colorado, on September 16, 2017. 

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Video: Notre Dame's pre-health study abroad program in Puebla, Mexico

In Notre Dame International's study abroad program in Puebla, Mexico, students can enroll in a unique pre-medicine track, taking classes on health-related topics at the Universidad Popular Autónoma del Estado de Puebla. Participants in this track also shadow doctors twice per week in two Mexican public hospitals, learning about different specialties and gaining valuable clinical experience. They return with valuable language and cultural experience and a new perspective on health care, which they can apply to their future health professions at home or abroad.

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Corbett Family Hall: A dynamic mix of academics, community, and technology

Corbett Family Hall strikes a stunning silhouette rising above the east side of Notre Dame Stadium. But for the Departments of Anthropology and Psychology, it’s what’s on the inside that counts. Below the club seating, terraces, and press box on the building’s top three levels, faculty and students from these two social science departments will come together in the new 289,000-square-foot structure, made possible by a leadership gift from Notre Dame alumnus Richard Corbett. With classrooms, laboratories, and offices all under one massive roof, research and teaching efforts are united in a way that will bring untold benefits.

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How focusing on parent-child relationships can prevent child maltreatment

Kristin Valentino’s research on evaluating the effectiveness of a brief relational intervention for maltreated preschool-aged children and their mothers is featured in a special section of Child Development. In order to help children facing maltreatment, researchers and clinicians first needed to address the heart of the problem. The relationship between the parent and child is key, she argues.

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Researchers propose new diagnostic model for psychiatric disorders

A consortium of 50 psychologists and psychiatrists — including Notre Dame professors Lee Anna Clark and David Watson — has outlined a new diagnostic model for mental illness, in what researchers hope will be a paradigm shift in how these illnesses are classified and diagnosed.

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Darcia Narvaez wins Expanded Reason Award for research on neurobiology and morality development

Darcia Narvaez, professor of psychology in the Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters and a fellow in the Institute for Educational Initiatives, has been named one of two winners of the first Expanded Reason Award for research. The award was given by University Francisco de Vitoria and the Joseph Ratzinger/Benedict XVI Vatican Foundation to recognize innovation in scientific research and academic programs based on Benedict XVI’s proposal to broaden the horizons of reason. Narvaez’s book, Neurobiology and the Development of Human Morality: Evolution, Culture and Wisdom, was chosen from among more than 360 total entries from 170 universities and 30 countries. 

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Three faculty members elected to Society for Multivariate Experimental Psychology

Notre Dame Associate Professors Lijuan Wang, Guangjian Zhang, and Zhiyong Zhang have recently been elected to the Society for Multivariate Experimental Psychology. A small, selective society that facilitates high-level research and interaction among its affiliates, SMEP is limited to 65 active members. With the trio’s election, Notre Dame’s Department of Psychology now has six members in the society—no other department in the country has more.

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NIH awards $3 million to Shaw Center for Children and Families

The National Institutes of Health has awarded researchers at the University of Notre Dame a $3 million grant to study the relationships between parents and infants, the first study of its kind that will include fathers as well as mothers as participants. The researchers, who will work with babies living with their married or co-habiting parents, will study the stability of the parents’ relationship and its effect on the wellbeing of their baby. Parents will go through a program designed to encourage healthy parenting and communication

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Lee Anna Clark receives two lifetime achievement awards for work in personality psychology and psychopathology

Lee Anna Clark, chair of Notre Dame’s Department of Psychology, will receive two lifetime achievement awards this year, reflecting the way in which her work has bridged two major areas of psychology. The Society for Personality and Social Psychology presented her with the Jack Block Award for Distinguished Research in Personality in January. The Society for Research in Psychopathology will honor her with the Zubin Award later in the year.

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Psychology undergraduates thrive through research experiences, building connections with faculty

For Katie Paige and Laura Heiman, research hasn’t just shaped their undergraduate experiences—it’s shaped their futures, as well. The two senior psychology majors have both gained significant research experience throughout their time at Notre Dame, writing senior theses and working closely with faculty members as they study topics ranging from depression to childhood development.

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New faculty member’s research on working memory published in Science

It didn’t take long for Nathan Rose to make an impact at Notre Dame. Just a few months after joining the faculty, he became the first member of the Department of Psychology to have a study published in the journal Science — and the second ever from the College of Arts and Letters. Rose, an assistant professor, examined a fundamental problem the brain has to solve — keeping information “in mind,” or active — so actions can be guided accordingly.

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Graduate Student Awards

Graduate students Kristina Krasich,  Raquael Joiner, Tony Cunningham, and Caroline Scheid recently received awards for their research.

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Alumnus David Barlow builds successful career in clinical psychology

As an undergraduate at Notre Dame, David Barlow ’64 was known as a good listener with a penchant for practical jokes and above all, a fascination with the human mind. Barlow turned that curiosity into a fruitful career as a clinical psychologist. A professor emeritus at Boston University, he is the founder and director emeritus of the institution’s Center for Anxiety and Related Disorders.

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‘The Frankenstein effect’ of working memory: Researchers examine how brain stimulation affects memory reactivation

A new study from Nathan Rose, assistant professor of psychology, examined a fundamental problem your brain has to solve, which is keeping information “in mind,” or active, so your brain can act accordingly. Rose and his team give weight to the synaptic theory, a less well-known and tested model that suggests that information can be retained for short periods of time by specific changes in the links, or weights, between neurons.

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