To view complete course descriptions for Fall 2014 go to  http://registrar.nd.edu/.

To search for a class and to view course descriptions for all psychology courses go to http://inside.nd.edu.

Fall 2014 Courses

PSY 10000 - Introductory Psychology First Year

A broad coverage of the methods and findings that characterize scientific psychology, including a description of historical and recent developments in the areas of learning and motivation; perceptual, cognitive, and physiological processes; social, personality, and child development; and abnormal behavior and clinical treatment. Open to first-year students only.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 13181 - Social Science University Seminar

An introduction to the seminar method of instruction accenting the organization and expression of arguments suggested by readings in psychology.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 13625 - Honors Seminar on the Self

This seminar draws from clinical, personality, and social psychological research to address fundamental questions about who we are and the extent to which we can change. For the first third of the semester, we will explore individual differences, or the key personality characteristics (and causes of these characteristics) that make one person different from the next. During the second part of the semester we will address the social self and examine the role of other people in forming and maintaining our personalities. During the final part of the seminar, we will discuss self-concept change and address the questions, "What does it mean to be a healthy person?" and "Can people really change?" We will discuss whether psychotherapy works and how it can induce self-concept change.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 14000 - Intro. To Psychology

Introduction to the principal areas of general pscydhology. Testbooks: Leahey, Historia de la Psicologia: Grandes Corrientes del Pensamiento Psicologico; and Moris; Psicologia. Un Nuevo Enfoque; Santiago, Z. Psicologia, and Whittaker, J.O. Psicologia.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 20000 - Introductory Psychology for Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors

A broad coverage of the methods and findings that characterize scientific psychology, including a description of historical and recent developments in the areas of learning and motivation; perceptual, cognitive, and physiological processes; social, personality, and child development; and abnormal behavior and clinical treatment. Open only to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 20001 - Introductory Psychology, Personalized System of Instruction (PSI)

This course covers the same content as PSY 20001 but is taught using an individualized, self-paced method of instruction. This method is a variant of the Personalized System of Instruction (PSI) format and includes features such as self-paced learning, emphasis upon mastery of the written rather than the spoken word, frequent testing and an option to retake unsatisfactory quizzes.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 20010 - Psychology: Science, Practice, and Policy

This one-credit seminar introduces the department's programs and faculty research interests as well as the profession of psychology. The goal is to encourage more active reflection on how psychology can be useful, both personally and professionally; also to present the major tensions within contemporary psychology as well as its potential impact on public policies in the decade ahead.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 20385 - Practicum in Diversity Training

This is a one-credit course designed to instruct students in the theory of diversity education while training them in the art of facilitating diversity discussions. The theoretical framework for the material in this course comes from the "theory of oppression" and the various individual, institutional, cultural, and systemic manifestations of that oppression. The application portion of this course entails the presentation of diversity programs in a required course (Concepts of Wellness) for first-year students. The structure of the Practicum in Diversity Training course includes theory instruction/training prior to the semester break, and making presentations/facilitating diversity discussions for the remaining portion of the semester.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 20670 - Practicum in Teaching Technology

An introduction to and experience in applying the principles and methods of behavior instruction in the classroom.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 20671 - Computers in Psychological Research and Education

Permission of instructor required. Possible projects include: education, work productivity, decision making, database management, expert systems, knowledge retrieval, data analysis, and experiment control. Projects may require campus mainframe computer or microcomputers, particularly the Macintosh or IBM PC. Same as CAPP 30360.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 20673 - Practicum in Organizational Improvement

This class will provide students teams with the opportunity to develop and/or implement a performance improvement plan for real local or national organizations. Elements of each plan will include (a) targeting one or more specific, high-priority needs of the organization, (b) creating actionable steps that can be taken to address those needs, (c) creating a measurement strategy to verify the effectiveness of the proposed steps, and (d) identifying methods for sustaining and refining the improvement plan over time. Readings and background information will be discussed in class relating to each component of the plan, and representatives of each organization will assist students with the formulation/implementation of plan components to ensure maximum effectiveness and fit within the company.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 20678 - Fundamentals of Business Thinking

This course is designed to provide an integrated understanding of the foundational business disciplines of accounting, finance, marketing, and management, especially for CAPP majors planning a career in business. Fundamental leadership and consulting skills will also be addressed. Case analysis, coupled with a highly interactive format, will be employed to ensure practical exposure to today's business environment. Primary areas of focus will address the critical elements for success in the corporate environment, the knowledge and preparation necessary to facilitate your interviewing process, and the business fundamentals for those with entrepreneurial aspirations.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 23090 - Social Concerns Seminar: Youth, Risk and Resilience

This seminar - formerly known as Children and Poverty - focuses on concerns that affect the youth of our nation, especially poverty and violence. Additional topics include resilience and efforts to foster positive youth development, including educational leadership. A week-long immersion in New York City provides an opportunity to meet with community leaders and policy makers focused on youth concerns. Participants read relevant Catholic social teaching and draw from a variety of resources/texts in psychology. Open to all Notre Dame students. Standard letter grade employed.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 23091 - Sustainable Development II: Research in Clean Water Initiatives

Seminar Description: This seminar is an extension of the fall 2009 Washington Seminar in Sustainable Development. The seminar will emphasize advanced study of clean water in conjunction with ongoing clean water initiatives through SAO, the Ford Program, and the Department of Engineering. In choosing the water issue, the CSC hopes to partner with student government's Global Water Initiative. Students' work will serve as a useful reference for the GWI, and will help the initiative to expand its efforts by offering a base of knowledge upon which it might anchor its current work and from which it can launch future efforts. Students will perform interdisciplinary a literature reviews around "point of use" issues for consumption of clean water. The research will be supplemental for ongoing projects and will focus on interdisciplinary perspectives of a this particular aspect of clean water. The seminar has chosen this topic as a direct result of student interest in The Global Water Initiative (SAO's 5 year plan to partner with a community organization to give students an opportunity to raise money for a just cause). The Seminar leaders include both sustainable development leaders from the fall 2009 class, as well as the student co-leaders of Notre Dame's Global Water Initiative. Steve Silliman (Engineering) current advises this group is very excited to partner with this seminar/CSC to move his research along. He is also working with Tony Polhen (Ford Program) to help coordinate his efforts in clean water. Tony has expressed interest in helping to oversee this seminar. Research will be conducted in interdisciplinary cohorts. Faculty experts will be asked to consult for 2 hours a month (no more than 6 hours total) on students research progress. Steve Silliman and students have suggested interested faculty in sociology, peace studies, anthropology, economics, and political science. Seminar classes will take on a format of literature search report/refining. Students will present their progress to the class at regular meetings of the seminar. Immersion: The seminar will travel to the Clinton Global Initiative University Meeting in Miami, Florida. The CGI U Meeting was chosen because of its emphasis on global development issues, because of the opportunities it offers for interaction with some of the best and brightest students from across the nation, and because its schedule includes a variety of sessions that will address a wide array of student interests. Travel to a conference in general is important in that it offers students an intensive opportunity for discernment and for interaction with other student leaders, from a variety of backgrounds, who work on social justice issues at their universities. Also, the CGI U awards money to innovative projects and students will hope to draw funds for the completion of these water projects.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 23095 - Lives in the balance: Youth, Violence, and Society

This Seminar examines the world of youth impacted by violence. To develop an understanding of the roots and consequences of aggression and violence, a comparative study will be conducted between South Bend and Over-the-Rhine, an inner-city neighborhood in Cincinnati, Ohio. Early in the semester, participants will visit a South Bend school and meet with local leaders and organizations that work with youth. During fall break, participants will spend a week in Over-the-Rhine, visiting with youth organizations, government entities, and schools. Participants will examine the history of the neighborhood, current youth-related challenges, solutions being implemented. Participants will analyze challenges each community faces, and identify tools used in Over-the-Rhine that can be implemented to benefit youth in the South Bend community. Readings (in Psychology & youth development) and written analyses will augment the direct learning experience. The course is built upon collaboration among the Center for Social Concerns, the Robinson Community Learning Center, and various University Departments. Apply Online: http://socialconcerns.nd.edu/academic/fall/fall.shtml
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 23096 - Understanding Mental Illness

In the United States alone, over 25 million people are affected with mental illness. Countless family members, friends and mental health professionals struggle to understand and help those diagnosed with these confusing and often debilitating diseases. Unless we know someone or struggle with similar issues ourselves, the majority of the rest of us know virtually nothing about the confusing "world" of mental illness. This seminar gives students the opportunity to learn about mental illness from the personal perspective of those most directly impacted by it: those living with it, family members, and health care providers. The goals of this seminar are to help students become more knowledgeable about these diseases and their early warning signs and to develop compassion for those who suffer from them.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 23099 - Crisis and Community

What is crisis? As a community, how do we interpret and respond to public crisis events? These guiding questions will propel our work into understanding a gendered crisis response from the perspective of the American Red Cross of St. Joseph County. In collaboration with the American Red Cross, we will examine multidisciplinary perspectives of public crisis events, theoretical approaches to crisis management and crisis communication, and the channels of communication necessary to prepare for, analyze, and respond to pubic crisis events. We will work with the American Red Cross to co-create a gendered approach to local crisis preparation and response that connects to regional, national, and international initiatives. Students will gain a gendered perspective of crisis response through analyzing case studies, evaluating theories of crisis and gender, and producing a summary report of recommendations in addition to a formal presentation for the American Red Cross.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 23271 - Autism

This seminar discusses topics related to developmental disabilities, with a special emphasis on pervasive developmental disorders and autism. Issues regarding their definition, etiology, and treatment are also discussed. (Must have access to own transportation)
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 23272 - Applied Behavioral Analysis

Applied behavior analysis is a field of inquiry that investigates the factors that influence human behavior and uses this knowledge to develop effective educational and therapeutic programs. This course will introduce the students to concepts, techniques, and methodology associated with this field. Students will observe ABA programs being used in home settings to teach children with autism and then have the opportunity to design and implement such programs with this same population. The course is especially recommended for students interested in developmental psychology, clinical psychology, and special education.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 23852 - Social Concerns Seminar: L'Arche Communities

This seminar centers around travel to a L'Arche community (e.g., Toronto, Canada) to share community life with developmentally challenged persons. Students draw from the philosophy of Jean Vanier, the works of theologian Henri Nouwen, and other spiritual writings to augment this participatory learning experience.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 23855 - Social Concerns Seminar: Take Ten

Ten is a research-based violence prevention program and curriculum designed at the Robinson Community Learning Center. Volunteers work on a weekly basis with schoolchildren of all grades to teach them the skills needed to resolve conflict peacefully. Take Ten's mission is to provide youth with positive alternatives to violence and build their capacity to make more informed choices when faced with conflict. Students participating in the Take Ten seminar will serve as Take Ten volunteers during the semester (February through April with training in January), being part of a team that works at a school in the area one time per week. Additionally, the readings and reflections will allow students to focus on understanding issues of youth and violence from various perspectives. Contact: Ellen Kyes at epaul@nd.edu. Approval required. Apply at Robinson Community Learning Center.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 24000 - Introductory Psychology

Introduces the study of psychology, the study of the human mind, in some of its many facets: epistemological issues, the brain, perception, learning, language, intelligence, motivation, development, personality, emotion, social influences, pathology and therapy and prevention. These will be seen from the scientific and scholarly point of view, but with emphasis on their relevance for everyday life. An important focus of the course will be the importance of theories and how they influence the gathering of data as well as the difficulty of objectivity when the object of study is also its primary tool: the human mind. One of the goals of the course will also be to prepare the student to read psychological literature with a critical eye, keeping in mind the difficulties involved in attempting to study human subjectivity in an objective way.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 24130 - Philosophicl Intro to the Mind

This course will introduce the philosophy of mind and the philosophy of psychology. The main topics will include the concept of mind, and the relation of the mental and the physical; the problem of consciousness; action and the explanation of action; the view of the mind of the main schools of psychology, including psychoanalysis and cognitive science.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 24800 - Introduction to Scientific Research

Taught at a host institution. SCI 30010 Introduction to Scientific Research at UCD; This module introduces students to the principles of scientific research through attachment to an active research group in the College of Science. Students will become active members of a research group and work under the direction of the group¿s Principal Investigator. Students will learn about the research focus of the group and conduct independent research into the scientific literature of relevance to the group¿s activity. They will shadow a member of the research team in the laboratory and master one basic and one advanced laboratory skill. Based on the research activity of the research group, students will learn about developing a research hypothesis and designing experiments to test the hypothesis. Using data generated by themselves and/or the group, students will learn how to analyse the research data and, where appropriate, how to determine whether the differences between control and test data are significantly different from each other. Students will also learn how to write a scientific abstract and a scientific report as well how to make a scientific presentation.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 24801 - Research Lab

Independent research carried out under supervision of a faculty member. A typewritten report of a research literature or an experimental study is required.
1.000 Credit hours
0.000 Lecture hours
1.000 Lab hours

PSY 25270 - Practicum in Developmental Disabilities

This practicum/seminar is the logical outgrowth of a long informal relationship that student volunteers have had with families in the Michiana community who have autistic and other special-needs children. The practicum aspect of the course will involve students going into a family home and working in a structured program with an autistic child for, on average, three times a week and a total of six to seven hours. In addition, students will meet in class once a week for discussion on a range of topics relating to autism, including issues regarding its definition, assessment, etiology, and treatment, as well as topics regarding the impact of autism on the family, community resources, and social policy. A number of classes will feature discussions led by parents of autistic children. This class is recommended particularly for students interested in child clinical psychology, education, developmental psychology, and social work.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 25275 - Sign Language

The American Sign Language class is designed to introduce basic vocabulary and simple sentence structure for conversational use. A cultural view is presented to examine traditions and values. A linguistic view is presented to introduce structure, syntax, and manual alphabet. Experiential activities, receptive and expressive exercises, and fluency opportunities are incorporated into the format. This is an introductory class for students with no prior knowledge of American Sign Language.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 26800 - Directed Readings

Directed reading is carried out under the supervision of a faculty member. A typewritten report on the reading is required.
1.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 10.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 27800 - Research Lab

Independent research carried out under supervision of a faculty member. A typewritten report of a research literature or an experimental study is required.
1.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 Lecture hours
1.000 TO 4.000 Lab hours

PSY 30100 - Experimental Psychology I: Statistics

An introduction to the analysis and evaluation of experimental data, with particular emphasis on measures of central tendency, variability, and covariability and their relationship to psychological theory and explanation.
4.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30105 - Exploratory and Graphical Data Analysis

The process by which Psychological knowledge advances involves a cycle of theory development, experimental design and hypothesis testing. But after the hypothesis test either does or doesn't reject a null hypothesis, where does the idea for the next experiment come from? Exploratory data analysis completes this research cycle by helping to form and change new theories. After the planned hypothesis testing for an experiment has finished, exploratory data analysis can look for patterns in these data that may have been missed by the original hypothesis tests. A second use of exploratory data analysis is in diagnostics for hypothesis tests. There are many reasons why a hypothesis test might fail. There are even times when a hypothesis test will reject the null for an unexpected reason. By becoming familiar with data through exploratory methods, the informed researcher can understand what went wrong (or what went right for the wrong reason). This class is recommended for advanced students who are interested in getting the most from their data.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30160 - Experimental Psychology II: Methods

A continuation of Psychology 30100, with emphasis on the design and methods of execution of psychological research. Training in writing reports in professional format is also provided.
4.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30200 - Developmental Psychology

Major theories and research findings on social, emotional, and cognitive development are covered. Although emphasis is on the time from birth to early adulthood, some research on adulthood and the elderly is included. Attention is given to how different environments enhance or hinder healthy development.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30220 - Adolescent Development

The second decade of life is a crucial developmental transition that poses significant physical, psychological and social challenges to young people; and which have implications for later psychosocial outcomes. This course explores the portrait of adolescence that is revealed by contemporary developmental science. We will examine adolescence in cultural and historical context and survey recent empirical literatures on some core topics, including pubertal maturation, the cognitive and social-personality development of teenagers, the struggle for self and identity, the influence of family, peers and schools on development, adolescent risk behavior and positive youth development, among other topics
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30250 - Cognitive Development

The focus of this course is on developmental changes in human cognition, such as perception, action, learning and memory, reasoning and problem solving, and language acquisition. The focus will be on early development (prenatal to 4-5 years) because this is the period of most dramatic change, although it will include some discussion of implications for later development. The goal of this course is to provide students with basic empirical facts of human cognitive development, as well as to ground them in broader theoretical issues, such as questions of what development means, and the central controversies in the study of cognitive development.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30253 - How Children think: An Introduction to Cognitive Development

How do infants and children perceive, remember, and learn about their world? This course will cover developmental changes in human cognition, such as perception, action, learning and memory, reasoning and problem solving, and language acquisition. The focus will be on early development (prenatal to 4-5 years) because this is the period of most dramatic change, although it will include some discussion of development during later childhood and adolescence. The goal of this course is to provide students with basic empirical facts of human cognitive development, as well as to ground them in broader theoretical issues, such as questions of what development means, and the central controversies in the study of cognitive development. An additional goal is to help students to be responsible consumers of psychology research.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30272 - Neurodevelopmental Disorders

The past two decades have seen a dramatic increase in the prevalence of neurodevelopmental disorders. This course will be a critical examination of the etiology, neurobiology, diagnosis, and treatment of developmental and learning disabilities. We will also investigate the impact of a developmental disability on the individual, family, community, and culture. Topics will include (but are not limited to) ADHD, Asperger syndrome, Autism, Down syndrome, Dyslexia, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, PKU, and Willams syndrome.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30300 - Psychology of Personality

This course is a survey of the contemporary study of personality in the context of its growth as a field of psychology. The focus is on personality as an empirical science. The course introduces perspectives or approaches to studying personality as well as theories, historical background, and modern research. Additionally, key issues such as the conceptualization and measurement of personality variables, the stability and consistency of personality, and real world applications are addressed. The course provides the opportunity to broaden student's understanding of the science of personality and to think critically about the application of personality theory in everyday life. Readings are primarily taken from a text, but additional readings and class materials may be assigned.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30310 - Abnormal Psychology

Defines the concept of abnormal or maladaptive behavior; reviews the principles involved in human development and adjustment and describes the common clinical syndromes, their causes, and treatments.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30314 - Introduction to Clinical Psychology

This course provides an introduction to clinical psychology. The emphasis will be on clinical research and empirically-based practices. It will cover (a) research methods for studying clinical phenomena (b) key issues and controversies in the field, and (c) specific topics such as classification and diagnosis, assessment, prevention, and intervention.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30340 - Multicultural Psychology

The purpose of this course is to examine and learn to talk about issues of culture and race in the United States from a psycho-social perspective. Culture and race are not synonyms. Therefore, this course will examine some of the ways that each affects the quality of our psychological functioning in American society. The goals of this course are to learn to recognize and appreciate culture in ourselves and others; to examine the different ways that cultural and racial socialization influence behavior, to consider how culture, race and identity relate to various psychological constructs, and to understand the ways in which these constructs operate in our society. To accomplish these goals, readings, group discussions, lectures, films will be used to increase our awareness of how these constructs operate in everyday life. As a student in this class, you will be encouraged to share your ideas and life experiences.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30341 - Multicultural Psychology

Given the changing demographics of the U.S. population, it has become increasingly important to understand how culture influences everyday life. This course will examine the impact of culture, ethnicity, and race on human behavior within the framework of psychological theory and research. Using an ecological perspective, the multiple contexts of individual, family, community, and society will inform the study of diverse populations. In particular, there will be an emphasis on ethnic minority groups in the U.S., including: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders, and Latino/a Americans. Within-group variations associated with culture-specific or indigenous concepts, acculturation, and minority identity development will be explored in depth.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30400 - Cognitive Psychology

A lecture course presenting a cognitive approach to higher processes such as memory, problem solving, learning, concept formation, and language.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30430 - Learning and Memory

A survey of the theories and methods relating to basic processes in learning and memory from both biological and cognitive perspectives.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30440 - Sensation and Perception

Includes a diverse range of topics, from sensory processes and perceptual development to sensory deprivation and visual illusions. Emphasis is on auditory and visual perception.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30500 - Physiological Psychology

The course is designed to provide a broad overview of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying behavior, cognition, and affect. The course considers the functioning of the mature nervous system, how the nervous system changes across the life span and the effect these changes have on behavior, and the neurobiological foundation of various neurological and psychiatric disorders. The content of the course is covered in lecture, readings, and written assignments.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30501 - Introduction to Biopsychology

The brain gives rise to all thoughts, feelings, learning- much of what we study in the field of psychology. In this course, you will learn the basics of how the brain works. Topics covered will include: how neurons transmit signals; basic neuroanatomy (functions of different parts of the brain); the neural basis of sensory processes, such as vision, hearing, smell and taste; movement and autonomic functions; motivations, such as hunger and thirst; emotions and stress; and cognitive functions such as learning, memory, and language. Examples and evidence will come from studies of brain-damaged human patients as well as animal neuroscience research. The evolution of the human brain and comparison to other species' brains will also be considered. Prerequisites: Introductory psychology. Some biology coursework will also be helpful, but not required.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30510 - Behavioral Genetics

Behavioral genetics is the study of genetic and environmental influence on individual differences, and can be used to examine all aspects of development. The purpose of the class is threefold: first, to orient students to the basic genetic principles necessary for the understanding of hereditary influences on development; secondly, to overview genetic and environmental influence on behavioral, biomedical, and bio-behavioral attributes; and, lastly, to assist students to realize that behavioral genetics is a powerful tool for the study of environmental as well as genetic influences on development.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30520 - Introduction to Cognitive Neuroscience

An "Introduction to Cognitive Neuroscience" is a survey course that introduces students to the biological substrates underlying various forms of cognition in humans, with a specific focus on mental processes. We will explore how psychological and cognitive functions are produced by the brain. Cognitive neuroscience is a branch of both psychology and neuroscience, drawing from disciplines such as biological psychology (biopsychology), neuroscience, cognitive psychology, and neuropsychology. We will cover a broad range of topics, including learning and memory, perception, development and neural plasticity, cerebral lateralization and language, emotions and social cognition, stress, sleep and dreaming, and consciousness. No previous coursework in neuroscience is required, but at least some experience with biology or biopsychology is preferred.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30600 - Social Psychology

An introduction to the major theoretical orientations within the field of experimental social psychology and a survey of the research findings in selected areas such as attitude formation and change, affiliation, interpersonal attraction, and social cognition.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30633 - Youth and Political Violence

This course will examine how youth are affected by political violence and war, with a focus on stress and coping in violent and post-war contexts. We will discuss major theories and recent research in developmental, social, and political psychology on these issues. The course will emphasize resilience processes, that is, identifying risk and protective factors that can explain why and how political conflict affects youth, with a focus on real-world application. Case studies and interdisciplinary readings from sociology, anthropology, literature, and political science will also be incorporated into the readings, lectures, class discussion, and writing assignments. Students will be encouraged to consult the existing empirical literature to suggest ways to (a) protect youth mental health on an individual level, and (b) decrease the potential for inter-group violence and promote constructive peacebuilding on a societal level.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30634 - Psychology of Peace

This course will provide an overview of the growing field of peace psychology, which seeks to apply psychological theory in order to better understand patterns of violence and nonviolence, identify effective conflict resolution techniques, and promote human dignity. The course will be divided into three primary domains: (1) psychological causes/effects of violence, (2) psychological causes/effects of nonviolence, and (3) conflict resolution, psychosocial interventions, and peacebuilding. Within each of these domains, we will discuss multiple levels of understanding (e.g., interpersonal, community, structural) and will draw direct connections to international conflict settings through the use of case studies, film, and supplemental readings.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30676 - Programming for Video Game Development

The purpose of this course is to provide students with experience in various aspects of programming for video game development. No prior programming experience is necessary and students will proceed at their own pace. In addition to several programming projects that utilize gaming APIs or frameworks, students will also be exposed to level design (map creation), 3D construction techniques, custom textures, sound design, and lighting effects. 3D game development will utilize the Hammer Editor, part of the Half-Life 2 video game modding Software Development Kit (Source SDK) and its associated tools. Additional third-party (and often free) utilities will also be necessary. Students will work on their own or in teams on a final project agreed upon with the instructor. Students will need to provide their own Windows compatible computer or laptop or a Mac running windows under BootCamp.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30699 - Innovation Studio

Students in this course will gather and process data and considered needs in order to produce a detailed proposal for a cross-disciplinary research environment that will be established within the new Engineering Learning Center in the Stinson-Remick Engineering Building. The resulting environment will be conceived through collaborative research conducted by marketing, engineering and design. Team-driven output during the course will result in a facility layout that considers technology requirements, furnishings, and an implementation plan capable of supporting and enhancing future university activities. The environment's purpose will foster meaningful innovation and problem solving through heightened academic unity between the colleges. The course undertaking will also serve as a preliminary test of Notre Dame's collaborative potentials, combining teaching resources from the College of Engineering, Mendoza College of Business and the Industrial Design Program in the College of Arts and Letters. The vision of this course enterprise focuses on the belief that collaborative discourse between university colleges will lead to increased understanding, heightened achievement, and global recognition that exceeds the potential of a single unit within the university.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 31243 - Moral Research Lab

An in-depth experience of moral development research that includes data collection as well as entering and coding data.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 Lecture hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lab hours

PSY 31672 - Practicum in Robotics

This course will allow students to work with the Nao humanoid robot platform. Students will learn about how to control the sensory and motor capabilities of the robot to produce specific sequences of robot behaviors and/or to allow the robot to respond to particular inputs from the external environment. Students will work with the instructor to identify the specific behaviors and response sequences to be created.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 33231 - Geriatric Neuropsychology

Cognitive disorders are escalating rapidly as the baby boomer generation ages. This course will provide an introduction to the clinical neuropsychology of normal and pathological aging. Common cognitive disorders among older adults will be contrasted to normal aging, including cerebrovascular diseases (such a stroke), Alzheimer¿s disease, and other dementias. Case studies will be presented to illustrate the link between cognitive impairment and challenges experienced by patients from a variety of cultural backgrounds. Students will gain an appreciation for local and national resources that can provide support to individuals with cognitive disorders and their caregivers.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 33643 - Using Research to Help Children Learn

Students who wish to integrate theory, practice, and empirical evidence in children's learning may choose to participate in a seminar that combines community based service-learning and research. Students will meet 75 minutes per week on campus to discuss a set of common readings covering topics including service learning, mentoring, children¿s learning and development, and research methods. In addition, students will be required to commit to spending at least two hours per week (one hour each on two weekday afternoons [M/W or T/R] for a total of approximately 25 hours) working with an elementary school child one-on-one in a local after-school literacy program. Students will keep a journal with entries for each visit with their child, and they will conduct research that involves the comparison among instructional techniques, materials, or behavioral management methods. Students will be required to integrate the theory and evidence from course material with their service experience and research findings. This seminar is only offered in the fall; however, students will be encouraged to continue their service to the after-school program during the spring semester through a 1-credit ESS service-learning option. *Please note: students may be required to provide their own transportation to/from the after-school program site. Every effort will be made to arrange transportation or to include sites that are within walking distance of campus.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 33651 - Educational effectiveness: Examining influences on students achievement

The class is designed to examine the factors affecting student achievement. It begins with students¿ influences on their own development (motivation, intelligence, efficacy) and works outward to the effects of families (SES, parenting practices, etc.), teachers (instruction, training, experience, content knowledge), and schools (what do effective schools look like?), examining whether and how each shape students¿ academic trajectories. We may also look at peer and neighborhood effects. The last part of the course considers programs designed for students, families, teachers, and schools in order to improve achievement. Throughout, the course will address issues of equity, considering whether and how policy-makers and educators can design programs to close the achievement gap.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 33685 - Social Factors and Sustainability: Effects of the Built Environment on Health and Well-Being

This course focuses on the interaction between people and the physical environment on human health, well-being, behavior, and sustainability. Social and physical factors across multiple scales ¿ from specific environments (residential, educational, work, healthcare, and commercial), urban and natural settings, to the planet - are explored. Issues of public health, environmental justice, universal design, and culture are included throughout. Lecture and discussion class with hands-on assignments and quizzes. Upper level undergraduate and graduate students from across the University and especially in architecture, the sustainability minor, design, pre-professional studies, social sciences, and business are encouraged to enroll.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 33686 - Introduction to Performance Management in Business

This introductory course will examine the principles, methods, and selected applications of performance management in business settings. Like Industrial and Organizational Psychology (IOP), performance management approaches share the common goal of improving corporate or organizational success, but they rely on established behavioral techniques and direct interventions, rather than the more diverse and eclectic methods characteristic of IOP. The field of Organizational Behavior Management (OBM) is the leading area of application for performance management techniques in business and organizational settings. Students will read an acclaimed text in the field, along with original research and methodological articles published in the OBM area. The course will involve three exams, including the final, and possibly a final project.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 33691 - Rethinking Crime and Justice: Explorations from the Inside Out

What are the causes and costs of criminal behavior? How are people and communities affected by incarceration? How can we make our criminal justice system as good as it can be for all stakeholders? This course brings together students from both sides of the prison wall to explore issues including why people commit crime, what prisons are for, realities of prison life and reentry, effects of victimization, and restorative justice perspectives. This course follows the Inside-Out model of prison exchange now well established across the United States. It provides an opportunity for "inside students" (at the Westville Correctional Facility) and "outside students" (from Notre Dame) to learn with and from each other and to break new ground together. Notre Dame students travel to Westville each week of the semester for dialogue with students at the facility, who have read the same relevant texts. Together they examine myths and realities related to crime and to punishment, explore the effects of criminal justice policy, and develop ideas for responding more effectively to crime in our communities.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 33694 - Cybercrime and the Law

Almost all crimes, or even human interactions, contain a digital component. The fact that "old" laws don't always fit "new" problems is no more apparent than in the area of cybercrimes. This course will include discussion of topics including: the methodology of typical cyber investigations, the application of the Fourth Amendment to digital evidence, and different types of cyber-specific laws enforced today. The course will also focus on the responses of both courts and legislators to the ever-evolving issues presented by computer crimes.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34030 - Learning and Memory

Taught at UDLA in Puebla, Mexico
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34100 - Biostatistics

STAT 20070 Biostatistics at UCD; What is Statistics? Random variation - signal, noise.Populations and random samples - the price we pay. Descriptive statisticsRandom variables - Binomial and Normal distributions - reading the tables. Sampling Distribution of a sample proportion and of the mean.Hypothesis testing and confidence intervals using a sample from a single population - Student's t tables.Sample size calculations.Comparison of two populations - hypothesis testing and confidence intervals. Independent and paired samples.Sample size calculations.Analysis of categorical data. Chi-square tables.Estimation and hypothesis testing for a population proportion.Comparing proportions in two or more populations using independent samples.Design of experiments. Validity and efficiency.Experimental unit and pseudoreplication. Randomisation.Structure in the experimental units - randomized block designs.Structure in the treatments - factorial designs.Introduction to Linear Regression and correlation.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34200 - Developmental Psychology

This course traces human psychological development from the beginning to the end of life. As well as giving a chronological account of what we know about psychological change across the lifespan, there is a strong focus on theoretical, conceptual, and methodological issues.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34209 - Developmental Psychology: An Evolutionary Approach

Taught as PS 3033 Developmental Psychology: An Evolutionary Perspective at St. Andrews University. This module is designed to equip students with an appreciation of key principles, concepts, methods and discoveries in developmental psychology, with an emphasis on evolutionary and comparative perspectives that are a particular strength of such work in St Andrews. The module aims to offer a broad perspective spanning infancy to childhood, and a range of key topics in cognitive and social development.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34210 - Psychology of Childhood

Taught as PS 123 in Puebla, Mexico. Introduction to the study of human development from conception, with emphasis on infancy through adolescence.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34216 - Sociology of Childhood

Taught as SO 202 - 'Sociology of Childhood' at a host institution. This unit will cover the social world that our society provides for children, and the social world that children create for themselves. We will consider how the meaning of childhood changes over time, place, and social context. We will see that there is no singular definition of childhood, but instead many different ways of experiencing youth and adolescence in Western societies and in the Global South. Children are socialized in a variety of social institutions (e.g., schools, family, work); the course should help us understand the effects these institutions have on children's lives and futures. Sexism, racism, classism, and abuse also affect children, and this unit will explore these and other negative childhood experiences. We will also pay special attention to why the relationship between youth and popular culture is routinely viewed as problematic, how children are discussed within the popular press, and examine how public policy (Children Rights included) and laws are formulated in response to this and other issues. This unit may be especially beneficial to current or future policy makers, teachers and counselors working with children, historians, family lawyers and advocates and parents alike.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34219 - Child Development in Changing Family Contexts

Taught at Trinity College in Dublin, Ireland as PS 3437 'Child Development in Changing Family Contexts' The family represents one of the most important environments within which children develop. This course examines theory, research and applied perspectives on the family as a context for children's development. The course aims to provide students with know
3.000 TO 3.500 Credit hours
3.000 TO 3.500 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34220 - Psychology of Adolescence

Physical, emotion and social development of the typical adolescent. The difference between boys and girls, and the social contexts in which these changes occur -- home, school. Focus on the conflicts which most adolescents encounter during their development, be it with physical self-image, peer pressure, or self-identity. Textbook: Santrock, J. (2204) Adolescencia (novena edicion) McGraw Hill, Spain When taught at Dublin, Ireland: PSY 20020 Child and Adolescent Development at UCD; During childhood and adolescence human development is taking place at a phenomenal pace, with children learning many of the skills that are crucial to their current and future emotional well being, relationships and cognitive functioning. This module explores the complex biological, psychological and cultural factors that influence this developmental process. The module introduces and critiques the major theories of developmental psychology that underpin understanding of this developmental process. Lectures span all aspects of child development from birth through adolescence pointing to important methodological issues and gaps in our current understanding.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34275 - Introduction to Disability Studies

This module provides students with an introduction to an emerging interdisciplinary field with three core strands: the history of disability; the lived experience of disability; and the array of personal, social, economic and civic interventions set in place in society on behalf of people with disabilities. The module comprises 11 x two-hour lectures weekly. Lectures will employ a variety of teaching methods, including video conferences, opportunities for students to meet invited speakers with experience in the field and links with cognate courses in EU countries and North America. Essay: Case study: 6 March 2009 Submission and Essay: Final assignment: 24 April 2009 Submission.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34289 - Family Studies and Contemporary Issues

This unit focuses on paradigms and an overview of experimental and clinical findings to the understanding and treatment of psychopathology. The course emphasises that the understanding of psychopathology is challenging and continues to evolve. A multidimensional integrative approach is proposed and applied to a range of psychopathologies. This unit introduces the sociodemographics of the Australian family and discusses changes in its structure and dynamics over a period of time. Issues salient to the larger family community are also debated (e.g. social infrastructure; human rights), as are policy issues relevant to the kinship system (e.g. poverty; unemployment; health; gender power relations). In the process of understanding these broader social issues, students will be given opportunities to explore situations that may present themselves in the human services industry.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34300 - Personality and Philosophy

Intoduction to personality theory; Philosophical questions relevant to psychology. Some of the topics covered will include: 1. Overview of the mind-body problem 2. Dualism 3. Logical behaviorism 4. Mind-brain identity theories 5. Eliminative Materialism 6. Functionalism and the computational models of the mind 7. Of minds and machines 8. Theories of consciousness
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34310 - Abnormal Psychology

This unit provides a broad framework for understanding the area of abnormal psychology. The unit deals with approaches to understanding the nature of abnormality, how models are constructed to explain abnormality as well as alternative paradigms and thinking in the area. Illustrations are drawn from a wide range of psychopathology including anxiety, depression, developmental disorders, schizophrenia and organic brain syndromes.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34312 - Psychological Assessment

Taught as PS 3032 Assessment in Clinical Psychology at St. Andrews University. This module presents psychopathological conditions and provides a basic understanding of the underlying neuronal and/or cognitive behavioural mechanisms. Examples will be drawn from the field of clinical psychology and/or clinical neuropsychology. The module will further explore in detail the tools and procedures used to assess psychopathological conditions by discussing their theoretical/statistical background and by demonstrating how to use these tools in clinical and experimental settings. Taught as PS 3453 Clinical Case Formulation in Adult Mental Health at TCD; This module introduces students to the framework and methods used by clinical psychologists in formulating cases of psychological distress in adults. The module examines psychopathology by promoting a critical appraisal of the various theoretical perspectives used in the assessment and formulation of adult mental health problems.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34314 - Adult Psychopathology

This unit lays a broad foundation in the area of abnormal psychology by identifying the genetic, biological, neurochemical, cognitive-behavioural and social frameworks that guide and constrain approaches to the definition, understanding and treatment of abnormal psychological functioning. Building on this theoretical foundation and empirical research findings, students are introduced to a wide range of psychopathology such as dementia, anxiety, depression, schizophrenia and substance use disorders. Explanatory models derived from alternative frameworks are discussed and evaluated within a contemporary, multidimensional, integrative model of psychopathology. The implications of these theoretical models for pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments are emphasised.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34315 - Counseling and Children

Working with children constitutes a specialist area within the field of counselling. Although counsellors working with children may share common philosophical and theoretical approaches with counsellor working with adults, how they apply this knowledge, how they relate to children and the mediums they use to engage children and invite them to tell their story, must, to be effective, be child-centred and child focused. This unit will explore he attributes, knowledge and skills needed to be an effective therapist with children.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34328 - Evaluation of Intellectual Abilities

"Focus on assessing intellectual abilites (maturity, reading, writing, I.Q.) of children and adults (but primarily children since assessing their intelligence plays a more important role in their development than it does for adults). We begin by talking about how to apply a specific exam. We administer the exam to a child or adult within a certain age range. We then score the exam, and write the conclusions in the form of a report. There have been three books assigned so far: Codigo Etico de los psicologicos de Mexico (Mexican code of ethics for psychologists), Nadie con Quien Jugar, (Osman, B.) and a book entitled: Ninos Inteligentes con Problemas Escolares, (Vail, Priscilla)"
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34331 - Counseling Skills Training

Counsellors need to be familiar with the philosophical and theoretical approaches, which guide their practice. Many different approaches are used in counselling, depending on how the client presents with his or her problem. This unit addresses a broad range of theories, including: Psychoanalytic theory, Existential Therapy, Gestalt therapy, and Behavioural approaches.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34339 - Clinical Cases

The course aims to import an understanding of the nature and extent of psychological problems across the lifespan. The incidence and prevalence of disorders will be explored, along with the implications for clinical practice and service provision. A close look will be taken at the nature and impact of psychological disorders upon families. Finally, the student will develop an understanding of the different theoretical perspectives that have been developed to help understand psychological problems.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34340 - Cultural Psychology

The object of the course as outlined in the syllabus is to contextualize and relate theoretical concepts and practices of psychology to culture, especially within Brazil. It will also include some aspect of Anthropology and Sociology. Students would be able to understand the relationship between human beings, their culture and psychology.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34342 - Psychology of the Mexican People

The objective of this course is to contribute to the student's humanistic and scientific formation by facilitating an understanding of the theoretical and practical elements of the psychology of the Mexican people, with the goal of understanding, assessing, and confronting the national reality.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34360 - Health Psychology

This course aims to provide a broad introduction to the study of how human psychology and human health intersect. A number of the major current issues in health psychology will be addressed, as will more specific research areas in which psychological knowledge can inform medical and health practice.
1.500 OR 3.000 Credit hours
1.500 OR 3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34361 - Psychology and Gender

A lecture and discussion based class of the differences between males and females in the field of psychology. Topics such as different personality and developmental theories, history of the development of the field of psychology, biological influences on behavior, portrayal of gender in the media and how it affects behavior are all addressed in the class.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34365 - Psychosocial Aspects of Human Movement and Exercise Science

Taught at a host institution. This unit emphasises the psychological and social correlates of involvement in physical activity and sport. Topics include social influence and self-presentation, cohesion, leadership, aggression, spectator psychology and the social psychology of exercise and health.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Psychology Department

Course Attributes:
ZOIR - Dublin, Ireland (IR), ZOPA - Perth, Australia (PA)

PSY 34370 - Trends in Psychoanalysis

Psychoanalysis has become an unavoidable part of modern knowledge, with far-reaching effects on the thinking, behavior, literature, morals and aspirations of our era. Not only in the restricted sphere of mental health, but also in medicine and education, and extending into everyday human relations, the consequences of Freud's thought have been revolutionary. This course is an introduction to the psychoanalytic way of understanding the human person and the worlds of feelings and thought.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34375 - Human Sexuality

Human sexuality is often a controversial topic, with people holding divergent views. This course proposes to focus on the psychological factors involved in sexuality in the context of biological, sociological and cultural factors. Various perspectives, e.g. the developmental and psychosocial, will be explored. Psychosexual behavior in the Irish context and current trends in investigating human sexuality will form part of the course.
3.500 Credit hours
3.500 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34386 - Development Practicum

The Development Practicum offers students a hands-on opportunity to learn about development in the field. Each student selects a development organization with which to complete a six-week Development Practicum. The practicum can be completed in Kampala or other areas of Uganda with organizations engaged in a broad spectrum of development projects. Students directly apply the concepts and skills of field-based learning discussed in the Field Study Seminar, the language capabilities developed through both formal instruction and informal practice, and the important area-studies background conveyed in the Development Studies Seminar. In addition, students have occasion to hone their skills in dealing with and learning from the unexpected as well as accomplishing a major learning task in a challenging new environment. MAJOR COURSE OBJECTIVES: 1) To provide the opportunity for hands-on experience with a development organization; 2) To select, design, and implement an individual study that investigates a dimension of development in Uganda; 3) To learn and utilize effectively a field-study report format.
6.000 Credit hours
6.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34400 - Cognitive Psychology

This course will examine the structure and function of mental processes, which account for human behavior. Topics include attention, perception, memory, problem solving, decision making, cognitive development, language, and human intelligence. Individual, situational, gender and cultural differences in cognition will also be explored. An individual research project or research paper is required.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34408 - Critical Thinking

This course will provide a basic knowledge about contemporary psychological findings on common difficulties in everyday thinking, and some ways to avoid frequent pitfalls. In keeping with the objectives of the Broad Curriculum Initiative, this course aims to help students improve their capacity to make sense of what they learn, to deal with knowledge in a critical manner, and develop their capacity to evaluate information and ideas. A broad range of topics will be covered including an introduction to psychology, argumentation and logical reasoning, cognitive biases and fallacies, and the role of emotion in thinking. (Please note: some details of the course may vary from the description given).
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34430 - Learning and Memory

"The processes of learning and memory are studied from different theoretical focuses."
3.000 OR 6.000 Credit hours
3.000 OR 6.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34434 - Visual Cognition

PSY 20080 Visual Cognition at UCD; This course provides an introduction to the study of visual cognition, of how 'seeing' allows us perceive a world of meaningful objects, actions and events. The focus will be on higher-order processes in vision including face perception, object recognition, attention and scene perception and will include topics on social cognition (e.g., the perception of action and biological motion). The course introduces the various ways in which psychologists study visual cognition; through the study of the neural basis of visual cognition, through the use of experimental psychology, and by studying the changes in perceptual and cognitive function that occur as a result of brain injury.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34440 - Development of Perception Throughout the Lifespan

Taught at a host institution. This course will involve a study of the capability, development and decline of the main sensory systems throughout the lifespan. The course will begin with a review of sensory and perceptual development in utero and the consequences of the rapid cortical development within the first years of life on visual, tactile and auditory perception. The effects of sensory impairment on perceptual development in the intact senses will also be discussed. Whilst the course will also focus on normal perception in adulthood, particular emphasis will be placed on the effects of ageing on sensory and perceptual capabilities.
3.000 OR 3.750 Credit hours
3.000 OR 3.750 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34455 - The Psychology of Language

Taught as PS 3462 The Psychology of Language at TCD; This module is designed to provide students with an advanced introduction to the study of language and psycholinguistics. It covers the central theories and issues in the psychology of language, including: the neural, social and cognitive bases of language; how the human brain supports production and comprehension of language; the structure and function of language; language acquisition and development, particularly in terms of its interrelatedness with cognitive and socio-cultural development; developmental and acquired language disorders.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34457 - Language & Language Disorders

Taught at Trinity College in Dublin, Ireland as PS 3415 ' Language and Language Disorders' This course provides students with an understanding of language acquisition and development, particularly in terms of its interrelatedness with cognitive and socio-cultural development. Aspects of clinical and neuro-linguistics are covered, i.e., the impa
3.000 TO 3.500 Credit hours
3.000 TO 3.500 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34459 - Thought and Language

This unit considers language from a cognitive perspective, focusing on models of language informed by what we know of how language is represented in the human brain, how human language evolved and how linguistic ability develops in the normal human child. The unit also introduces basic concepts in the formal modelling of linguistic systems.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34460 - Perception and Sensory Neuropsychology

This unit examines the theoretical, functional and biological bases of perception. Students learn about the bases of normal perceptual behaviour and the impact of brain damage on that behaviour. Students also learn how to conduct behavioural research that addresses neuropsychological models of perception and elaborates the functional aspects of human perceptual performance. The unit is intended to provide a solid foundation in the skills needed to conduct perceptual research and to help students link the results to both normal and abnormal perceptual function.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34470 - Emotion

Taught as PS 4088 Emotion at St. Andrews University. This seminar based module involves readings and discussions on psychological theories of human emotion. The following questions are examined in detail: What constitutes an emotion? Are there basic emotions universal to all humans? Or do experiences of emotion differ across cultures? How are emotions different (or the same) from moods and feelings? The module includes topics on emotion and motivation; social psychological perspectives on emotion; the interface between affect and cognition; cultural variation in emotion; biological and evolutionary bases; and papers on specific emotions such as anger, happiness, guilt, shame, and disgust. Critical analysis of theory and research on emotion is emphasized.
3.750 Credit hours
3.750 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34500 - Physiological Psychology: Motivation and Behavior

Titled "Psychophysiologie: motivation et comportement" at host institution. This teaching is a study of the adoptive regulations of the behaviors by considering the neuraux and hormonal mechanisms. One 1st part is an introduction to the ontogenèse behavior. Principal of the theories behaviorists and ethologic bases, the study of the instinct and the training is evoked as well from the historical point of view as experimental. The other parts study certain mechanisms psychophysiologic. The mechanism endocrinien and neurobiology of the stress (and more generally of the emotions) are developed, then three examples psychophysiologic of basic behaviors are described (the phenomenon of print, the sexual behavior, and the food behavior), by integrating the ethologic approach, the neuroanatomical approach (study of the cores hypothalamic and limbic) and approaches it neuro-endocrinienne (role of the hormones and neurotransmitters used). When taught at Dublin, Ireland: PSY 20010 Biological Psychology at UCD; This module will introduce student to two main subdivisions of biological psychology, namely physiological psychology and psychopharmacology. The methodological and conceptual basis of each subdiscipline is considered and selected topics such as sleep, memory, pain, and the effects of drugs on behaviour are explored in detail.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34505 - Neuro-physiology

PSY 10060 Brain and Behaviour at UCD; This module provides an introduction to the relationship between brain and behaviour. Students will be provided with an introduction to the main approaches in biopsychology. Students will gain an understanding of how the brain is involved in everything we do, whether it be eating, sleeping, learning, or feeling pain. Throughout the course, case studies and video-clips will be presented to help show the link between brain and behaviour and to explain clinical disorders and real-life problems that neuroscientists study. The goal is to demonstrate that the link between brain and behaviour is important for students who are considering further study in psychology, neuroscience, or other biological or health-related areas, but it is also of interest to any student with a general interest in behaviour.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours

PSY 34520 - Integrated Brain

NEUR 20030 Integrated Brain at UCD; This module will explore the structure and function of the neuron and nervous system including the brain and its component parts. Basic principles of brain evolution and development will be discussed. Students will also be introduced to sensory and motor neuroscience, learning and memory and diseases of the nervous system including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. During the course of the module students will be required to submit an essay from a list of topics provided in advance.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34525 - Fundamentals of Neuroscience and Behavior

Taught as PSY 30050 "Human Neuropsychology" at host institution. This module will introduce the student to the principles and methods of clinical and experimental neuropsychology. The methodological and conceptual basis of neuropsychology are considered and the course emphases both a functional and an anatomical approach to the study of brain-behaviour relationships. The study of clinical patients with brain injury and disease and the experimental study of healthy individuals are discussed. The module concludes with an overview of the practical application of the field in the diagnosis of brain injury and the subsequent rehabilitation of neurologically impaired individuals.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34539 - Psychology of Addiction

PS 3444 A Cognitive Neuroscience Approach to Addiction at TCD; Drug addiction can exert powerful influences over human behaviour with inordinate amounts of time devoted to drug seeking and taking and often at great expense to the addicted individual's personal, family and economic life. This course will focus on what is known about the cognitive and emotional processes involved in addiction with an emphasis on the neurobiology of these processes. The course will review research on a number of drugs of abuse (cannabis, ecstasy, cocaine, heroin, alcohol and nicotine) and will address relevant theoretical issues (e.g., is cannabis a "stepping-stone" drug?) as well as describe current treatments for dependence. The scope will also be broadened to address other addictive behaviours (e.g., food addictions and gambling).
3.000 TO 3.500 Credit hours
3.000 TO 3.500 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34600 - Social Psychology

Taught at a host institution. Studies in the methodologies and principles of individual, interpersonal and collective social behaviors as well as the importance of social interaction in the construction of the personality, in the processes of social influence and change, in small and large group settings.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34625 - On Origins of Self-Awareness

"PSY 30230 On the Origins of Self Awareness at UCD; 'Self-awareness is arguably the most fundamental issue in psychology, from both a developmental and an evolutionary perspective' (Rochat, 2003). This module will explore the evolutionary and developmental origins of `self' and `self awareness'. The approach will be both philosophical and empirical. Following a philosophical clarification of the varieties of problem attending the concept of self, the seminar will explore the evolutionary context for the emergence of selfhood, and will then examine the infantile and early childhood origins of the strands of selfhood. The seminars will be participatory. On completion of this modules students should be able to critically evaluate theoretical accounts of the evolutionary and developmental origins of self-awareness."
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34631 - Negative Attitudes: Cultural, Historical, & Social Psychological Analysis of Racism in South Africa

This course provides a basic overview of the social psychological principles that describe and explain the development and functions of attitudes (beliefs-stereotypes, feelings-prejudice, and behavior-discrimination) and how these influence relationships on an individual and group basis. These social psychological principles will then be used to analyze the development of and institutionalization of racism within the cultural-historical context of South Africa - one that is defined by intergroup conflict between the English and Afrikaans cultural groups, the tribal conflicts among the African tribes, as well as the black-white apartheid conflict. This portion of the course contextualizes the psychological in the historical-cultural-economic context. Finally, the course culminates in reading and discussing the words and life of Nelson Mandela whose response to institutionalized racism that oppressed his people and resulted in his incarceration for 27 years was one of reconciliation. Questions dealing with appropriate responses to negative attitudes as well as programs or policies to change existing negative attitudes or prevent the development their future development will be discussed. This course will count as a 30000-level course for psychology majors or as a college social science requirement for students in the College of Arts and Letters.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34637 - Identity, Culture, & Globaliization

This course will provide students with a basic overview of the social psychological principles that describe and explain the development and functions of the self and identity. This overview will include concepts such as self, identity formation, identity development and principles of social influence that shape social behavior. The purpose of this overview is to provide students with a social psychological perspective that will then facilitate a critical reading of the topics dealing with globalization, identity, violence, and multiculturalism. This course is intended as a mid-level reading-writing-discussion course in which students will be expected to keep a journal chronicling their experience of and reactions to class discussions as well as their reactions to their broader experience of their experiences outside of the classroom.
3.000 Credit hours
12.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34660 - Developmental Psychology

Follows the development of the child through adolescence with emphasis on the complexity and continuity of psychological development The course will emphasize the interaction and interdependence of the various systems: biological, genetic and environmental, as well as the interaction and interdependence of cognitive and social factors in the various stages of development from the prenatal period through adolescence. Particular attention will be placed on attachment theory, the development of the self and possible pathological outcomes of faulty development. Prerequisite: PS 101.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34679 - International Psychology

PSY 30300 International Psychology at UCD; International psychology examines the theory and practice of psychology around the world. It is a relatively new branch of psychology, having been established in the United States in the 1990's. An important step in this regard was the recognition by the American Psychological Association of a new Division for International Psychology (Division 52) in 1997. Since then, a "Handbook of International Psychology" (2004) has appeared, along with related literature such as "Towards a Global Psychology" (2007). The study of international psychology includes the geographical dispersion of psychology, characteristics of psychology in individual countries and the international organisations that exist to promote psychology. We will also look at the claims by pychologists in Asia, Africa and Latin America that 'western psychology' has cultural limitations and the various alternatives that have been proposed.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34680 - Psychology of Work

The unit is an eclectic combining of the theoretical and the practical in examining the roles of individuals as members of organisations. Through lectures, workshops, case studies and a workplace-oriented assignment, students will be challenged to develop new paradigms of thinking about the psychology of the individual in the workplace. The Psychology of Work is a blend of organisational behaviour, sociology, organisational theory, management, leadership, human resource issues and psychology. It examines contemporary management thinking in the context of cause-and-effect on individuals and subsequent performance and encourages dialectic about organisations as rational decision making bodies. Where appropriate, guest speakers will be invited to talk about current workplace and people issues that they experience as managers and leaders. The teaching approach is one of active learning and students are required to participate fully in the blend of workshops and lectures throughout the unit. I believe that learning should also be a pleasant experience and a sense of humour is most welcome if not mandatory.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34681 - Human Factors

Taught at Trinity College in Dublin, Ireland as PS 3407 'Human Factors' The subject area of human factors is in part concerned with human performance limitations and the origins of performance variability. Applications of human factors to the workplace and to highway and aviation safety will be emphasised. Implications for th
3.500 Credit hours
3.500 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34682 - Organizational Psychology

Taught at Trinity College in Dublin, Ireland as PS 3406 'Organizational Psychology' This course provides an introduction to core theoretical areas in the psychology of work and organizations. It deals with organizations as systems and cultures as well as with how people function within organizations (as leaders, team-workers etc.). In pa
3.500 Credit hours
3.500 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34689 - Psychology: Behaviour in Context

Taught as PSYC 1102 "Psychology: Behaviour in Context" at host institution. This unit introduces students to the broad scope of psychology, with a particular emphasis on developmental, social psychology and interpersonal communication, intelligence and personality, and abnormal psychology. The unit provides an overview of these central topics and the links between them. It is taught through a co-ordinated series of lectures and laboratory tutorials.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34690 - Introduction to the History of Psychology

PSY 20150 at UCD; This course will provide an introduction to the history of psychology. The main text for the course is Graham Richards', "Putting Psychology in Its Place" (2010). This will occasionally be supplemented by other material. Major emphasis will be placed throughout the course on understanding psychology in relation to its social context. The role that psychology has played, and continues to play, in society will often be examined in a critical light.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34692 - Evolutionary and Comparative Psychology

Taught as PS 3036 Evolutionary and Comparative Psychology at St. Andrews University. This module will address evolutionary and comparative approaches to psychology. The aim is to provide an understanding of major evolutionary forces and how they have shaped animal and human behaviour and psychology. Key principles, concepts and methodologies will be introduced and related to specific topic areas such as the evolution of social behaviour and the evolutionary origins of language and cognition.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34697 - Psychology and Crime

Taught as PSY 30080 "Psychology and Crime" at host institution. This module examines the overlap between theories and research within criminology and within psychology in order to examine the concept of crime from an inter-disciplinary perspective. Rather than being a course in Forensic Psychology, it offers a critique of the potential of such an approach. Gender disparities in offending, the efficacy of drug criminalization, and psychological aspects of the criminal justice system such as eyewitness testimony and jury decision-making are covered, as are sensitive topics, such as recidivism among child sex offenders and intervention with offenders.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34698 - Culture and Psychology

This unit will introduce students to the debates and issues underlying the field of Cross-Cultural, Indigenous and Cultural Psychology to understand diverse conceptions about the role of culture and its implication for professional practice. To promote cultural competence in the Australian context, distinctions between migrant issues and Indigenous issues will be explored. A diversity of psychological theoretical frameworks and methods will guide more appropriate responses to deal with racism and oppression. Alternative paths, which enhance and empower cultural identity and wellbeing, will be pursued to address the broader issues of social justice. The role of culture, worldview, and other contextual factors in shaping our realities, and subsequently our adaptations to societal contexts, will be considered. A major aim of the course is to support conscientization (Freire, 1970, 1972) about the role of self in promoting culturally competent practice in diverse contexts.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34900 - Special Studies

Independent research carried out under supervision of a faculty member. A typewritten report of a research literature or an experimental study is required. Taught in London.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 37900 - Research Lab Jr

Independent research carried out under supervision of a faculty member. A typewritten report of a research literature or an experimental study is required.
1.000 TO 3.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 10.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 40120 - Advanced Statistics

This course extends PSY 30100 in two respects. First, additional attention is given to the logic of inferential statistics. Special focus is placed on the purpose, strengths, and limitations of hypothesis testing, especially as it is used in psychological research. Second, this course considers statistical analysis of data from more complex data structures than typically covered in PSY 30100. The goal of this part of the course is to heighten students' awareness of the variety of research questions that can be addressed through a wide range of designs and accompanying analyses. The orientation of the entire course focuses much less on the computational aspects of analyzing data than on the conceptual bases of what can be learned from different approaches to data analysis.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 40126 - Introduction to Quantitative Neuroscience

Quantitative neuroscience is an emerging interdisciplinary field between psychology, statistics, computer science, biology, and medicine. This new field is expected to facilitate major breakthroughs on a number of topics ranging from schizophrenia, artificial intelligence, consumer behavior, to spirituality. This course is designed to introduce important topics and state-of-the-art research methods in quantitative neuroscience to students of diverse backgrounds. Example topics include functional MRI, diffusion tensor imaging, MEG/EEG, general linear models, principal component analysis, factor analysis, independent component analysis, cluster analysis, and artificial neural networks. Students will use these statistical techniques to analyze behavioral data and imaging data released by the Human Connectome Project, which is an ongoing large scale project with the aim of uncovering how brain circuitry relates to a variety of psychological phenomena.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 40305 - Difficult Personalities

This course is about personality disorder (PD), a form of psychological disorder thought to develop from the interaction of persons' genetic makeup and their childhood/adolescent experiences. The course will cover the different ways that PD is conceptualized and how research is changing these conceptualizations; the possible causes of PD; how PD is measured, diagnosed, and treated PD; and how PD relates to other kinds of psychopathology.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 40306 - Personality and Individual Differences

This course surveys major theoretical and empirical issues in the contemporary research literature regarding personality traits and other important dimensions of individual differences (including intelligence). Covered topics typically include the consistency and temporal stability of behavior, the influence of heredity and environment in personality and intellectual development, the nature and organization of traits, accuracy and bias in person perception, and the role of personality in interpersonal attraction. We also examine how personality is related to a diverse range of outcomes, including occupational success and job satisfaction, happiness and life satisfaction, health and lifestyle variables, and various forms of psychopathology.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 40632 - Psychology of Prejudice and Group Conflict

The social psychological study of prejudice and group conflict emerged in the United States and Europe in the mid-twentieth century as a consequence of two major phenomena: (1) the devastation of World War II in Europe (particularly the culmination of exclusionary nationalism and anti-Semitism in the Holocaust), and (2) the growing recognition of the social injustice of racism and ethnocentrism in the United States, realized in policies like segregation. In the spirit of these origins, this course examines both local (i.e., U.S.) and global settings of conflict between groups in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. We focus on the psychological processes implicated in maintaining and exacerbating conflict, including prejudice and discrimination, racism, stereotyping, and categorization more broadly. We examine the relationship between these psychological processes and structural asymmetries between groups, thus integrating psychological and social-structural levels of analysis. We review major theory and research in social and political psychology on these issues, with a focus on real-world application in the interest of reducing conflict, addressing power asymmetries, and transforming relations between groups.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 40655 - Cognitive Development

This course provides an introduction to the central issues in the field of cognitive development. It will cover (a) general frameworks for studying cognitive development, (b) key questions in the field, and (c) specific topics such as conceptual development, memory development, language development, and the development of mathematical understanding. The primary focus will be on cognitive development from infancy to adolescence. Students will be expected to synthesize and evaluate material presented in lectures, readings, and class discussions.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 40669 - Anthropology of Childhood and Education

Concepts of human growth vary extraordinarily across time and space. When children become full-fledged persons, when they can reason, when or whether they should be independent from their parents, and how all this happens are variable and illuminating. Education - either formal or informal - reflects and also constitutes a society's view of childhood. This course provides a (selective) cross-cultural survey of childhood and education, looking at stages from pregnancy and infancy to late adolescence. Students will devise and conduct projects of their own.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 40675 - Introduction to Artificial Intelligence

A broad overview of the field of Artificial Intelligence (AI), including its historical and philosophical foundations, classical and contemporary approaches, cognitive systems, and recent trends and applications. Topics include traditional AI techniques (e.g., searching, problem solving, knowledge representation and reasoning, planning, constraint satisfaction, decision making), probabilistic and network based approaches (e.g., Bayesian models, neural networks), computational models of cognition (e.g., models of perception, action, memory, cognitive architectures), and recent developments in natural language processing, speech recognition, robotics, human-computer interaction, machine learning, and computational emotions.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 40676 - Human Computer Interaction

An in-depth coverage of the field of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) including its history, goals, principles, methodologies, successes, failures, open problems, and emerging areas. Topics include the fundamental principles of HCI (e.g., consistency, compatibility, pictorial realism), models of the human (e.g., perception, attention, memory, learning), interaction modalities and paradigms (e.g., windowing systems, haptic interactions), best-practice design principles (e.g., user-centered design, universal design, rapid application development), techniques to evaluate interfaces and interactions (e.g., observational methods, think-aloud protocols, cognitive walkthroughs), and emerging topics in HCI (e.g., affective computing, augmented cognition, social computing, ubiquitous computing).
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 40677 - Digital Analysis and Forensic Psychology of Cybercrime

The use and interaction with digital devices is a part of daily life. This course will introduce students to the principles of forensic psychology as they apply to cybercrime offenses along with the field of computer forensics techniques and methodologies. Topics to be covered include the motivations of hackers, online child offenders, cyber stalkers, and identity thieves along with electronic discovery, Windows forensic analysis procedures, and Macintosh forensic analysis procedures.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 41280 - Family Research Methods

The primary goal of this course is to provide you the opportunity to receive advanced training in family research methods by working closely with faculty, professional staff, graduate students, and advanced undergraduate students. You will learn about both a) the substantive areas of developmental psychology, family functioning, and the effects of family processing on children, and b) conducting research and various aspects of running a major research project concerning families and children. Our class periods and time outside of class will provide direct and hands-on experience with all phases of conducting major research projects on children and families, including topics such as marital conflict, parental depression, community violence and children, applied projects for educating parents about family processes based on research, and other topics. Our goals are that by the end of the course, you will: 1) Have advanced understanding of the methods and approaches used in research on families and children. 2) Have practical knowledge about the methods for conducting this research. 3) Be knowledgeable about the major theories that form the basis of this research. 4) Be knowledgeable about the findings and empirical research on family relationships and children. 5) Be able to critique the literature and be able to identify possible directions for future research.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43220 - Adolescent Development

Focuses on adolescent development within various social contexts, including family, peer groups, and the workplace. Special emphasis on normative development at the transition from childhood to adolescence.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43230 - Mental Health and Aging

The primary purpose of this course is to expose students to basic issues relevant to the mental health of the elderly, which includes an experiential learning component in the form of volunteer relationships with an older adult. In the classroom, students will be challenged to think critically about the mental health issues associated with later life and are expected to actively participate in class discussions. Topics focused on pathological aging include psychological disorders, assessment, diagnosis, and treatment; resiliency in aging topics include: physical and mental health, social support, personality, coping, and stress. Class presentations, volunteer activities, and the readings will be used to stimulate discussion and critical thinking. Students will also keep a journal for this purpose. The format of the course may include some lecture, but will rely heavily on class discussion and group activities. Students are required to participate in some type of volunteer activity over the course of the semester (i.e., a minimum of one hour/week). Students may generate their own volunteer placement or I can help match you up with one.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43231 - Geriatric Neuropsychology

Cognitive disorders are escalating rapidly as the baby boomer generation ages. This course will provide an introduction to the clinical neuropsychology of normal and pathological aging. Common cognitive disorders among older adults will be contrasted to normal aging, including cerebrovascular diseases (such a stroke), Alzheimer's disease, and other dementias. Case studies will be presented to illustrate the link between cognitive impairment and challenges experienced by patients from a variety of cultural backgrounds. Students will gain an appreciation for local and national resources that can provide support to individuals with cognitive disorders and their caregivers.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43240 - Moral Development

Students are challenged to think about the nature of moral development, learn how to examine and compare theories in moral development, develop critical thinking and have the opportunity to create a study of moral development. The course reflects on Catholic Social Teaching and its relation to moral identity and social action generally and in our own lives.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43246 - Self, Ego, & Identity

This seminar examines the major theoretical traditions that help us understand what it means to be a person. Particular emphasis is placed on developmental processes and recent empirical findings.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43247 - Leadership and Social Change

This course actively explores means to promote positive social change and the common good. How do leaders foster a sense of human potential, moral imagination, and common purpose? What new models of learning, organization, and collaboration may contribute to efforts to address social challenges such as income inequality, youth at risk, environmental change, and political/global divisions? What can we learn from Catholic social tradition and research on ethical development to work toward a just word? Such questions will form the basis of our dialogue and research together. The course is interdisciplinary and draws student leaders from various student organizations. Readings from multiple perspectives are discussed in a seminar format, complemented by independent student research and experiential learning opportunities. Central themes include skill building to respond to social concerns, unleashing creativity and innovation for change, and a focus on solutions and what works. Throughout, the course provides means for students to reflect on their own development and purpose. In the fall of 2014, students will also be offered the opportunity to contribute to the creation of a future fellowship/certificate program at Notre Dame that will integrate leadership development and social innovation. Contact instructors for entry.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43250 - Cognitive Development

Major theories in cognitive development and data relevant to those theories are reviewed. Mechanisms that might account for observed developmental changes across the life span (e.g., processing speed) are discussed.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43251 - Language Development

This seminar will focus on research and theories addressing a fundamental scientific question: How do humans learn language? Readings and discussions will focus on contemporary research, as well as some classic studies, investigating how children learn about the sounds, meanings, and syntactic structures of their native language. The focus will be on mechanisms of development - not simply what infants and children learn at a given age, but how they learn, including hotly contested debates over this process. The primary focus will be the acquisition of a first language by typically-developing infants and children, but we will also examine factors relating to variability in this processes, such as socio-economic status and developmental disorders.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43254 - Developing Minds

In this course, students will learn some of the ways cognition changes with age, experience, and education. Cognition in this course is defined broadly and includes, but is not limited to, basic processes such as memory, knowledge of subjects taught in school (e.g., reading and arithmetic), and thoughts about one's self as a learner (e.g., perceived self-competence). The age range covered is from birth to old age. Two fundamental questions addressed throughout the course are: What cognitive abilities do individuals of different ages bring to learning environments? And how do learning environments affect individuals' thinking?
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43271 - Autism

This seminar discusses topics related to developmental disabilities, with a special emphasis on pervasive developmental disorders and autism. Issues regarding their definition, etiology, and treatment are also discussed. (Must have access to own transportation)
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43272 - Applied Behavioral Analysis

Applied behavior analysis is a field of inquiry that investigates the factors that influence human behavior and uses this knowledge to develop effective educational and therapeutic programs. This course will introduce the students to concepts, techniques, and methodology associated with this field. Students will observe ABA programs being used in home settings to teach children with autism and then have the opportunity to design and implement such programs with this same population. The course is especially recommended for students interested in developmental psychology, clinical psychology, and special education.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43273 - Asperger Syndrome - The Short Life and Death of a Diagnosis

Asperger syndrome was first identified by a little-known Nazi doctor in 1944. It was rumored that much of his work was lost in an Allied bombing in 1944 - but was it lost or just ignored? It was not until 1981, one year after his death, that his work became prominent. By 1995, Asperger syndrome was internationally recognized as a distinct syndrome. A community of individuals with the diagnosis soon embraced the label as an identity, and pop culture romanticized this "Geek syndrome." By 2013, however, Asperger syndrome will no longer exist. How did this happen? This seminar will be an exploration of the set of circumstances that led to end of the diagnosis, and the resulting social implications. We will touch on fundamental issues in multiple areas of psychology, but from the unique perspective of a single condition.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43282 - Developmental Psychopathology

This course articulates principles for a lifespan perspective on the origins and development of individual patterns of adaption and maladaption.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43288 - Practicum in Child Maltreatment

This course is intended to expose students to the child welfare system and the effects of child maltreatment and foster care on child development. The seminar portion of the course will include training on mandated reporting, and the child welfare system, and discussion of current research on child maltreatment, foster care, child development, and developmental psychopathology. The practicum portion of the course is designed to give students hands on experience with children in custody of the Department of Child Services in South Bend. Each student in the practicum will be paired with a child who is currently placed in foster care because of substantiated child maltreatment. The student will serve as a mentor to this child, and will spend 1-2 hours with the child twice weekly in the child's foster home.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43313 - Science and Pseudoscience in Psychology

This course emphasizes the use of critical thinking skills for distinguishing science from pseudoscience in psychology. Picking up where Introduction to Clinical Psychology (PSY 30314) left off, this course takes up the torch of Popper, Meehl, and Lakatos to cover topics such as: (a) controversial therapeutic, assessment and diagnostic techniques, (b) weak theories , and (c) myths from "pop" psychology and every day life.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43315 - Innovations in Psychotherapy and the Science of Self-Concept Change

This seminar raises the question of whether people really can change their maladaptive personality traits and psychological problems. We discuss the latest innovations in psychotherapy, as well as the scientific advancements that lend insights into how and why people benefit from these treatments.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43317 - Seminar on Evidence-Based Psychotherapy

In this seminar, we will discuss about various psychotherapy approaches with a focus on evidence-based modalities. The course will cover a brief history / model of psychotherapy and psychotherapy research methodology, followed by general discussions on psychotherapeutic approaches within evidence-based treatment, such as Behavior Therapy, Cognitive-Behavior Therapy, and more recent "third wave" therapies (e.g., Dialectical Behavior Therapy, Behavior Activation, and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy).
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43318 - Stress, Disorder, and Disease

There is considerable scientific interest in the concept of stress and its implications for health and well-being. This seminar will cover (1) original articles on the concepts and definitions of stress; (2) original articles on methods for assessing life stress; and (3) the animal and human research literatures on stress effects on biological and psychological functioning. Particular attention will be paid to the implications of these ideas and literatures for understanding psychological disorders, especially major depression, as well as physical illnesses.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43334 - Intervention Science

This course is designed to examine current questions and methods in intervention research with specific focus on cognitive behavior therapy and its variants. We will be approaching the field from several vantage points including 1) the methods needed to address questions regarding the evaluation of the efficacy and effectiveness of interventions; 2) the often uneasy alliance between science and practice, 3) the promise and challenge of technology transfer, that is the dissemination and implementation of "therapies that work" By the end of the term, students will have gained knowledge of the questions in intervention science, the methods used to address these questions and how these questions and methods may help to reduce the burden of major forms of psychopathology.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43344 - Immigrant Families and Mental Health

This course examines major psychological topics relevant to immigrant families in the U.S. and factors influencing their mental health. Given that one out of five youths in the American public school system is a child of immigrants, it is critical to study this rapidly growing population especially for those interested in working with youths and their families. Broad areas to be covered include cultural adaptation processes (e.g., acculturation), biculturalism, identity development, family processes, academic achievement, and mental health as well as implications for culturally competent mental health treatment and service delivery.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43360 - Health Psychology

Because behavior plays a significant role in people's health, psychology has emerged as an important contributor to the process of coping with disease, disease prevention, and health enhancement. This course is designed to be an overview of health psychology and behavioral medicine. Topics will include psychology and medicine, health psychology models, stress and health, adaptation to illness, psychological aspects of cancer, pain, coronary artery disease, rehabilitation, infectious disease, health promotion and disease prevention, and professional opportunities in health psychology. In addition, health care professionals in the community who are working in areas to be covered in the course will be making presentations to the class. There will be two exams that will cover reading and lecture material. In addition, there will be two short papers that will help integrate the readings, lectures, and information provided by the speakers. Finally, there will be a lengthy paper that will consist of a summary review and critique of research in a specific area of health psychology.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43362 - Understanding Eating Disorders

In this seminar, we will explore the etiology and treatment of eating disorders. We first will examine biological, psychosocial, and cultural risk factors for the development of the various eating disorders. We then will discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the current diagnostic classification of these disorders as well as related pathologies. Finally, we will critically examine current prevention and treatment efforts, paying particular attention to their underlying theoretical assumptions and empirical evidence of their efficacy.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43364 - Social Inequities in Mental Health and Health Outcomes

This seminar will examine the problem of mental health and health disparities in the U.S. and possible solutions for addressing such inequities. Specifically, the course will explore how race, poverty, and other social conditions have contributed to a greater burden of unmet mental health needs and physical illness among ethnic minorities and other underserved populations, primarily using the lens of psychological theory and empirical research. Strategies for addressing these disparities will also be discussed, including an emphasis on improving access to, and quality of, mental health services and psychological interventions for ethnic minorities and other underserved populations in the U.S.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43365 - Sport Psychology

This course will focus on the application of psychological concepts and current research to the enhancement of performance in both sports and fitness activities. An emphasis will be placed on techniques and strategies that have been used effectively to maximize skill performance with an understanding that that many of the real-life behaviors evident in sport are transferable to other performance endeavors. Topics include overview of the field, motivation, personality factors, self-concept, team development, leadership, psychological skills training, and exercise adherence. Students will produce a "handbook" targeted for specific population of performers which will apply the concepts learned throughout the semester.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43367 - Psychology of Coaching

This course is ideal for anyone who might serve as a coach at any time in the future. Topics include coaching strategies, substitution strategies, designing practices, dealing with parents, and the like. Conducting actual practice sessions and discussing relevant movies are scheduled throughout the course. There are no tests as a final portfolio is the sole grading method. Books include Phil Jackson's Sacred Hoops and Andy Hill and John Wooden's Be Quick But Don't Hurry.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43434 - Visual Memory

Every day you leave your dorm room and head out across campus to attend class, work out, meet with friends, and participate in club activities. On these walks, you may stop to look at new and interesting sculptures, hallway displays, buildings, and landscapes that catch your attention. You probably see many of the same people and say hello as you pass. If campus construction blocks your normal route, you can easily find a new one, perhaps one that you have never taken before. You likely come home and tell your roommates about some of the events you witnessed on your walk. These experiences depend on your ability to store knowledge of your visual world in memory. Without such memory, you would be unable to recognize your friends and surroundings. You would be unable to notice changes in your environment. You would be unable to recount your own autobiographical experiences. In this course you will learn how memory for objects, scenes, faces, places, and emotion-inspiring events are created, how these memories are stored, and how we use visual memory to support our daily activities. In some sense, then, this course is about a walk through campus and students will become aware of the amazing, striking, and at times desperately limited nature of memory for our visually based experiences.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43451 - Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Attention deficit disorder (also known as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) is a diagnosis applied to children and adults who have experienced a handicap in their school, home, work, and/or social settings due to abnormal levels of distractibility, impulsively, and/or hyperactivity. According to epidemiological data, approximately 4% to 6% of the U.S. population has ADD, which makes it one of the most prevalent psychological disorders in contemporary society. Furthermore, it is currently believed that 66% of those diagnosed with ADD as children will continue to exhibit symptoms as adults. Over the past decade, there has been heated debate over both the cause and treatment of ADD. For instance, ADD has been attributed to a variety of causes including minor brain damage, poor diet, and poor parenting. Likewise, a variety of different treatment options have been recommended including medication, behavior therapy, and cognitive therapy; and recently, there has been concern expressed by the FDA that several medications used to treat ADD might be harmful to children. This seminar will provide a comprehensive survey of current research into the cause and treatment of ADD. In addition, the seminar will focus on the effects of this disorder from the perspective of both afflicted individuals and their families as well.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43455 - Seminar: Psycholinguistics

An interdisciplinary seminar with emphasis upon student participation covering topics such as linguistics, memory, and perception for language stimuli, child language, bilingualism, and social psychology of language.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43456 - Pragmatics of Language Usage

This seminar will survey research and theory in Pragmatics and Psycholinguistics concerning the communicative functions of language. Topics will include Searle's classification of speech acts, Grice's Maxims and the conversational implicatures, Sperber and Wilson's Relevance Theory, and Clark's theory of Language-as-an-Action.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43495 - Deciding to be Green

The primary goal of the course is to examine how descriptions of environmental issues and our understanding of these issues impacts our perception of their importance and our decisions about appropriate actions. Research in cognitive psychology has shown that the way in which a problem is framed and the way in which information central to the problem links up to pre-existing concepts systematically impacts the perception of the problem and consequently decisions that are made about possible outcomes or solutions. Thus, focusing on the cognition underlying our relationship to the environment is a critically important component of any initiative that tries to transform understanding into action, a stated goal of this year's Presidential Forum "Charting a Sustainable Energy Future".
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43526 - Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience: The Sleeping Brain

This seminar will provide a broad introduction to the cognitive neuroscience of sleep. Topics covered will span human sleep disorders, sleep in various animals species (e.g. unihemispheric sleep in dolphins), learning and memory during sleep, sleep's role in creativity and insight, plasticity in the sleeping cortex, sleep and consciousness, and dreaming. We will also examine neuroimaging, neurophysiological, and behavioral approaches to the study of sleep, discussing critical questions such as "what is sleep?" and, "why do we sleep?"
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43531 - Psychology and Medicine

This course has two basic objectives. First, it examines from a lifespan and psychobiological perspective the factors that place individuals at different stages of life at risk for illness and assist them in maintaining their health. In addition, it addresses a variety of challenging psychological and social issues that physicians and other healthcare professionals must face in the practice of medicine. The course covers a range of topics dealing with health issues related to different stages of human development (childhood, adolescence, and adulthood), disabled populations, culture and gender, stress, physician-patient interactions, death and dying, professional ethics, and social policies relating to health care. The course is primarily intended for students intending to enter medical school. Most classes will involve brief formal presentations by the instructors and invited guests, followed by discussion of assigned readings pertinent to the day's topic. In addition, students will be exposed, via a limited practicum, to a variety of medical settings.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43533 - Topics in the Neurophysiology of Stress

In this seminar, you will learn about one of the major systems involved in the body's response to stress: the system which controls production of the stress hormone cortisol. In addition to the physiology of the stress response, this course will address what kinds of events provoke a stress response; when the stress response is adaptive vs. maladaptive; and how stress hormones affect the brain, and thus influence learning and memory. Additional topics covered may include: the effects of chronic stress; stress and reproduction; effects of early experience on stress responsiveness; stress and psychopathology; the role of neurosteroids (a class of hormones that act on neurons) in stress. Readings will include review articles and original research reports; one goal of this course will be for you to become proficient at reading and understanding scientific literature. Prerequisites: Introductory psychology. Introductory biology recommended. Physiological Psychology or concurrent enrollment in Introduction to Biopsychology recommended.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43534 - Applied Beh Oncology Research Seminar

The goal of this seminar is to introduce students to the field of cancer control and survivorship research. This seminar will specifically examine issues related to the assessment and management of biobehavioral and psychosocial adverse effects of cancer and its treatments. Students will learn to critically evaluate the biobehavioral oncology research literature and obtain important skills in the development of clinical research protocols to improve quality of life for patients and survivors.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43535 - Cultural Aspects of Clinical Medicine

This course focuses on social science approaches to sickness and healing. The medical encounter is examined from anthropological perspectives. The course emphasizes the difficulties traditional biomedicine has in addressing patients' expectations for care. Students serve an internship as patient ombudsman in a local hospital emergency room 4 hours per week. Students MUST have access to transportation to participate in the ER internships. Students are required to sign a waiver, to present evidence of immunizations, and to receive a TB skin test.
4.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43540 - Applied hormones & behavior: incorporating measurements of cortisol and other hormones in psychology

This course is designed for graduate and undergraduate students currently involved in social sciences research, especially research related to emotion, stress, and depression, who would like to learn more about the physiology of stress as well as hands-on practice of laboratory techniques for measuring hormones in saliva samples. The course will cover background on neuroendocrinology and stress physiology through lectures and readings - both textbook chapters and primary scientific literature. The course will also cover scientific and logistical considerations that must be taken into account when incorporating hormone measurements in social sciences research. Finally, course participants will learn step-by-step how to store, prepare, and analyze saliva samples for steroid hormones (e.g. cortisol) using radioimmunoassay, with a hands-on laboratory component. (Only participants who have completed radiation safety training may take part in the radioimmunoassay.) Assignments will include short written assignments and quizzes. Graduate students will be required to complete a presentation on a proposed research project. Enrollment with instructor permission only.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43625 - Self: Philosophy and Psychology

Who are you? What are you? What is the self? Does it even exist in reality in an absolute sense? What is the nature of social reality and our relationship with it? Social psychology provides some insights into these questions and issues and can inform our thinking and understanding of our selves and our world. Although the broader theoretical and philosophical context for this seminar is social psychological, we will have the opportunity to read about these topics from a variety of sources - psychological, philosophical, and theological.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43640 - Educational Psychology

Educational Psychology examines questions about development, learning and achievement in schools. In this course we will explore fundamental questions such as (a) What is intelligence? Is it fixed or changeable? What are the implications of conceptions of intelligence for achievement? (b) How does learning occur? What are the implications of different theories of learning? Is there a "correct" theory of learning? Does learning differ in different subject areas? (c) What motivates student learning? Can instruction be "motivational"? (d) What is "good" instruction? How do theories of learning relate to instructional practices? (e) How do aspects of school context, such as interaction with peers and teachers, and school culture, influence learning, motivation and achievement?
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43641 - Motivation and Academic Learning

Traditional studies of learning have focused almost exclusively on cognitive, or "cold," processes. Recent research on learning illustrates how "hot" processes also influence thinking and academic learning. In this course, we focus on how social, motivational, and emotional influences interact with cognitive processes to affect academic learning. Social influences will include students' social goals in school, friendships, and family dynamics. Motivational influences are explored through the study of major theories of achievement motivation, including attribution, self-efficacy, intrinsic motivation, "possible selves," and goal theories. Emotional factors such as coping mechanisms, test anxiety, and wellbeing also are discussed. In addition, we explore how development affects students' social, motivational, and emotional responses to learning. Child, adolescent, and adult models are discussed, and applications to educational child settings will be an integral part of the course.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43650 - The Psychology of Diversity in Higher Education

This course provides an overview of issues pertaining to diversity and diverse college students. In this course, "diversity" is defined in terms of various demographic characteristics, such as race/ethnicity, social class, gender, and religion. Topics include not only psychological concepts related to diversity (e.g., cultural psychology, stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination), but also how these concepts are relevant to university settings (e.g., student interactions, college admissions) and how college diversity experiences may affect student outcomes.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43684 - Seminar in organizational Behavior

This discussion oriented seminar will examine the principles, methods, and selected applications in the field of Organizational Behavior Management (OBM). Like Industrial and Organizational Psychology (IOP), OBM shares the common goal of improving corporate or organizational success, but it relies on established behavioral techniques and direct interventions, rather than the more diverse and eclectic methods characteristic of IOP. Along with an acclaimed text in the field, students will read and discuss original OBM research, review, and theoretical articles. Some class time will be set aside for discussion of relevant articles or other OBM topics, and students will be required to complete a final project that could involve a research review paper, the results of a modest OBM intervention conducted on campus during the semester, or a detailed proposal for a performance improvement plan developed to assist a local business or campus group.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43693 - Healthy Lifestyles - Risky Business

This course considers a variety of topics related to living a happy/healthy life (e.g., marriage, money, faith, career, etc.). Each student will review the values they presently hold on these topics via autobiographical methods. Then each student will imaginatively project the path their life will likely take via teleographic techniques. Finally, the role of risky decisions (e;g., choice of mate, insurance, gambling, investments, etc.) in forming our life paths will be intensively studied via various models of risk management. Styles of class: Participation in class discussions will constitute 1/3 of class grade; an oral final will constitute another 1/3 of the grade; the final 1/3 of the grade will be based upon analysis of reaction papers (25 pages minimum) on the topics covered.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43696 - Is There an Environmental Crisis?

Whether one believes there is an environmental crisis or not, we should all be aware of the changes in our world (growing world populations, increased burning of hydrocarbons, etc.) that are hypothesized to produce threates to our ecosystems. Understanding why human actions might be producing global changes is a complex task. This course will concentrate on the roles that various disciplines (e.g., economics, materials sceince, biology, psychology, theology) might play in understanding and (perhaps) alleviation human-produced environmental changes.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43815 - On Evil

Does evil exist? If it exists, what is it? If it exists, is suffering an example of evil? If it exists, does its existence pose an insuperable problem for Christian belief in God? Is there an adequate philosophical approach to understanding evil, or are all such approaches bound to fail? These and other questions often fall under what is called the "problem of evil." This course seeks to better understand what that problem might be, and what might be said about it in the context of orthodox Christian belief, primarily from a philosophical perspective, but also at points theological.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 44272 - Developmental Disabilities: Integrating Theory and Practice

In this course, students learn how knowledge and understanding of developmental psychology inform professional practice in schools for pupils with Austic Spectrum Disorders and Learning Difficulties. The course examines how children with Autism come to understand their world and how teachers and other school-based professionals devise programmes to meet children and young people's very individual needs. The course is based at Drumbeat School, a state school for children and young people with ASD. Each week, students spend time with pupils and professionals in classrooms. This practical focus is followed by lectures on the Autistic Spectrum; Language and Communication; Challenging Behaviour; Sensory Perception Difficulties, Multidisciplinary Therapeutic Practice and Inclusion, etc. Students have opportunities to meet with parents and families of young people with Autistic Spectrum Disorders. Special Notes: London Undergraduate Program permission required. Application before departure. Course fees: Travel to Drumbeat School will be partially subsidized. The level of travel costs to be paid by the students will be confirmed before the start of the semester. Textbooks: No textbook assigned.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 44350 - Social and Cognitive Development

This course examines social and cognitive development (and more importantly, the links between them) over the first six years of life. In developing an understanding of how a young child comes to understand her world and the people in it, we will look at influences as diverse as genetics and environment, family and sibling relations, friendships and starting school. Students will have the opportunity to see videos of British children at various stages in their socio-cognitive development, and will learn about the importance of individual differences in understanding development. We will also take a brief look at development in children facing demanding social and/or cognitive challenges, such as deafness, autism, hyperactivity and giftedness.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 44370 - Developmental Disabilities

In this course, students learn how knowledge and understanding of developmental psychology inform professional practice in schools for pupils with severe and profound learning disabilities. The course examines how children with severe developmental disabilities come to understand their world and how teachers and other school-based professionals devise programmes to meet children's very individual needs. The course is based at Riverside School (formerly called Rectory Paddock School), a State school for young pupils with severe learning disabilities. Each week, students spend time with pupils and professionals in classrooms. This practical focus is followed by a class that treats such topics as Severe and Profound Learning Disabilities; the Autistic Spectrum; Language and Communication, Children with Complex Health Needs; Challenging Behaviour; Multidisciplinary Therapeutic Practice; and Integration. Students have opportunities to meet with parents and families of young people with disabilities.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 44455 - The Psychology of Language

PSY 20060 at UCD. Language dominates our cognitive and social activities and psycholinguistics examines the relationship between language and the human mind. This course will look at what language is, whether it is uniquely human, and how it is related to biological and cognitive processes. Children's acquisition of language will be outlined and aspects of language processing and use in society will be explored. The objective of this course is to introduce students to the main principles, methods and findings of psycholinguistics.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 44531 - Medical Psychology

Analyze the origin, development and principles of Medical Psychology as an important element in the Physician-Patient relationship, and the way in which the medical student will relate organic illness to the overall health of the patient.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 44690 - History and Systems of Psychology

PSY20120 Introduction to History and Theory of Psychology at UCD. The course wil provide an introduction to the contemporary literature on history and theory of psychology. Student textbooks will be used and no previous knowledge of the subject will be assumed. Essay: 2-3,000 words, can be on any relevant topic; Examination: one hour, essay questions.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 44900 - Special Studies: Reading and Research

Independent research carried out under supervision of a faculty member. A typewritten report of a research literature or an experimental study is required.
1.000 TO 6.000 Credit hours
1.000 TO 6.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 45270 - Practicum in Developmental Disabilities

This practicum/seminar is the logical outgrowth of a long informal relationship that student volunteers have had with families in the Michiana community who have autistic and other special-needs children. The practicum aspect of the course will involve students going into a family home and working in a structured program with an autistic child for, on average, three times a week and a total of six to seven hours. In addition, students will meet in class once a week for discussion on a range of topics relating to autism, including issues regarding its definition, assessment, etiology, and treatment, as well as topics regarding the impact of autism on the family, community resources, and social policy. A number of classes will feature discussions led by parents of autistic children. This class is recommended particularly for students interested in child clinical psychology, education, developmental psychology, and social work.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 45386 - Psychology Externship

This course provides an opportunity for students to gain supervised work experience in a health, school, or social service agency. The student will be expected to find a placement from among those specified by the department where they will be required to spend 8 hours a week. A learning agreement will be required. The classroom componenet of the course is a weekly two-and-a-half hour seminar where the issues from the externship experience and relevant research materials will be discussed.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

PSY 47805 - NSF/REU Psych Research

This is a zero-credit course for students engaged in independent research or working with a faculty member of the University on a special project. No course work is required.
0.000 Credit hours
0.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 47809 - Senior Thesis

The Senior Thesis requires a year-long investigation on an original topic of study under the tutelage and mentorship of a faculty member. It must result in a substantial written product that will be evaluated by the thesis advisor. Any senior psychology major may undertake a Senior Thesis provided that the student is in good academic standing and has secured the approval of a faculty mentor. Faculty members may consider other academic qualifications as a condition for supervising a thesis, such as GPA, performance in certain courses, experience in a research lab, relevant background experience, favorable letters of reference and compatible scholarly interests.
3.000 Credit hours
0.000 Lecture hours
3.000 Lab hours

PSY 47900 - Special Studies: Reading and Research

Independent research carried out under supervision of a faculty member. A typewritten report of a research literature or an experimental study is required.
0.000 TO 6.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 10.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 47901 - Special Studies-Attention: From Philosophical Analysis to Computer Algorithms

The nature of attention has been of interest to philosophy, psychology, neuroscience, biologically inspired computer vision, as well as to social science. In this tutorial course, various accounts of the nature of attention will be considered, with the central aim of implementing one of those accounts computationally in a final project, in such a way as to capture a chosen aspect of attention, such as the role of visual attention in multistable perception or in visual search.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 48800 - Senior Honors Thesis

These two seminars assist the senior major to propose, execute, and write an honors thesis. The first semester is devoted to the development and presentation of the proposal, and the second to its execution, write-up, and subsequent presentation.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours