Lee Anna Clark

Lee Anna Clark

William J. and Dorothy K. O'Neill Professor of Psychology

Ph.D., University of Minnesota

  • Clinical

(574) 631-4515

lclark6@nd.edu

Corbett Family Hall

Notre Dame, IN 46556

Center for Advanced Measurement of Personality and Psychopathology (CAMPP Lab)

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The assessment of personality disorder, for which she developed the Schedule for Nonadaptive and Adaptive Personality (SNAP), a psychological test that measures personality traits across the normal-abnormal spectrum.

Profile

Dr. Clark is a clinical psychologist whose research focuses on the assessment of personality disorder, for which she developed the Schedule for Nonadaptive and Adaptive Personality (SNAP), a psychological test that measures personality traits across the normal-abnormal spectrum. She is widely published and is one of the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI)'s "most highly cited" psychologists. She was on the Personality and Personality Disorder Work Group for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorder, 5th Ed. (DSM-5), and of the Personality Disorder Working Group for the International Classification of Diseases, 11th Ed. (ICD-11), which is the international standard for diagnosis of mental disorder.

Professor Clark's current research focus, which was funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, aims to identify the core elements of personality pathology that are needed to diagnose personality disorder, and to determine how personality pathology relates to other types of psychopathology and to psychosocial disability. For her work that spans the fields of personality and psychopathology, Dr. Clark was awarded the Society for Personality and Social Psychology's 2017 Jack Block Award for Distinguished Contributions to Personality, the Society for Research in Psychopathology's 2017 Joseph Zubin Award for Lifetime Contributions to Psychopathology. and the 2019 John Gunderson Senior Researcher Award by the International Society for the Study of Personality Disorder.

Recent Publications

(* = my students during data collection / manuscript preparation)

Clark, L. A., Nuzum, H., Shapiro, J. L., VanDerBleek, E. N., Daly, E., & Simons, A. D. (July 2019).  Personality functioning-plus-trait profiles as potential targets for intervention: Identification and replication.  Personality and Mental Health, online first, ahead of print. Invited paper for a Special Issue. doi: 10.1002/pmh.1455

Clark, L. A., & Watson, D. (March, 2019).  Constructing validity: New developments in creating objective measures instruments.  Psychological Assessment. Online first, ahead of print. Invited paper for a Special Issue. doi: 10.1037/pas0000626

Kotelnikova, Y., Weaver, C. A. & Clark, L. A. (2019).  The joint structure of maladaptive personality traits and psychopathology. Journal of Research in Personality, 81, 64-71. Invited paper for a Special Issue. doi: 10.1016/j.jrp.2019.05.007

Nuzum, H., Shapiro, J. L., & Clark, L. A. (2019).  Affect, Behavior, and Cognition in personality and functioning: An item-content approach to clarifying empirical overlap. Psychological Assessment,31(7), 905-912. doi: 10.1037/pas0000712

Nuzum, H., Ready, R., E. & Clark, L.A. (2019). Comparability of self- and other-rated personality structure. Psychological Assessment, 31(6), 741-750. doi: 10.1037/pas0000696

Clark, L. A., Nuzum H., & Ro, E. (2018).  Manifestations of personality impairment severity: Comorbidity, course/prognosis, psychosocial dysfunction, and “borderline” personality features.  Current Opinion in Psychology, 21, 117-121. doi: 10.1016/j.copsyc.2017.12.004

Vittengl, J. R., Clark, L. A., Thase, M. E., & Jarrett, R. B. (2018).  Relations of shared and unique components of personality and psychosocial functioning to depressive symptoms. Journal of Personality Disorders, 32, 577-602. doi: 10.1521/pedi_2017_31_313

Clark, L. A., Cuthbert, B. N., Lewis-Fernandez, R., Narrow, W., & Reed, G. M. (2017).  ICD-11, DSM-5, and RDoC: Three approaches to understanding and classifying mental disorder. Psychological Science in the Public Interest, 18, 72-145. doi: 10.1177/1529100617727266

Dindo, L.*, Brock, R. L., Aksan, N., Gamez, W., Kochanska, G., & Clark, L. A.  (2017).  Attachment and effortful control in toddlerhood predict academic success over a decade later.  Psychological Science, 28, 1786-1795.

Ro, E., Nuzum, H.*, & Clark, L. A. (2017). Antagonism trait facets and comprehensive psychosocial disability: Comparing information across self, informant, and interviewer reports. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 126, 890-897. doi: 10.1037/abn0000298

Brock, R., *Dindo, L., Clark, L. A., & *Simms, L. J. (2016).  Personality and dyadic adjustment: Who you think your partner is really matters.  Journal of Family Psychology, 30(5), 602-613. doi: 10.1037/fam0000210

Clark, L. A., *Vanderbleek, E., *Shapiro, J., *Nuzum, H., *Allen, X., *Daly, E., Kingsbury, T., Oiler, M., & Ro, E.  (2015).  The brave new world of personality disorder-trait specified: Effects of additional definitions on prevalence and comorbidity. Psychopathology Review, 2(1), 52-82.       doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.5127/pr.00

Newton-Howes, G., Chanen, A., & Clark, L. A. (2015).  Personality disorder across the life span. Lancet, 385, 727-734.

Sharp, C., Wright, A. G. C., Fowler, C., Frueh, C., Oldham, J., & Clark, L. A. (2015).  The structure of personality pathology: Both general (‘g’) and specific (s’s) factors? Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 124(2), 387-398.  doi: 10.1037/abn0000033

Clark, L. A., & Ro, E. (2014).  Three-pronged assessment and diagnosis of personality disorder and its consequences: Personality functioning, pathological traits, and psychosocial disability.  Personality Disorder: Theory, Research, & Treatment, 5(1), 55‑69.  doi: 10.1037/per0000063

*Sharma, L., Markon, K. E., & Clark, L. A. (2014).  Toward a theory of distinct types of “impulsive” behaviors: A meta-analysis of self-report and behavioral measures.  Psychological Bulletin, 140(2), 374-408.  doi: 10.1037/a0034418

*Sharma, L., *Kohl, K., *Morgan, T. A., & Clark, L. A. (2013). “Impulsivity”: Relations between self-report and behavior.  Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 104(3), 559-575.  doi: 10.1037/a0031181