Courses

To search for a class and to view course descriptions for all psychology courses go to inside.nd.edu.

PSY 10000 - Introductory Psychology First Year

A broad coverage of the methods and findings that characterize scientific psychology, including a description of historical and recent developments in the areas of learning and motivation; perceptual, cognitive, and physiological processes; social, personality, and child development; and abnormal behavior and clinical treatment. Open to first-year students only.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 13181 - Social Science University Seminar

An introduction to the seminar method of instruction accenting the organization and expression of arguments suggested by readings in psychology.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 14000 - Intro. To Psychology

Introduction to the principal areas of general psychology. Testbooks: Leahey, Historia de la Psicologia: Grandes Corrientes del Pensamiento Psicologico; and Moris; Psicologia. Un Nuevo Enfoque; Santiago, Z. Psicologia, and Whittaker, J.O. Psicologia.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 20000 - Introductory Psychology for Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors

A broad coverage of the methods and findings that characterize scientific psychology, including a description of historical and recent developments in the areas of learning and motivation; perceptual, cognitive, and physiological processes; social, personality, and child development; and abnormal behavior and clinical treatment. Open only to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 20010 - Psychology: Science, Practice, and Policy

This one-credit seminar introduces the department's programs and faculty research interests as well as the profession of psychology. The goal is to encourage more active reflection on how psychology can be useful, both personally and professionally; also to present the major tensions within contemporary psychology as well as its potential impact on public policies in the decade ahead.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 23090 - Social Concerns Seminar: Youth, Risk and Resilience

This seminar - formerly known as Children and Poverty - focuses on concerns that affect the youth of our nation, especially poverty and violence. Additional topics include resilience and efforts to foster positive youth development, including educational leadership. A week-long immersion in New York City provides an opportunity to meet with community leaders and policy makers focused on youth concerns. Participants read relevant Catholic social teaching and draw from a variety of resources/texts in psychology. Open to all Notre Dame students. Standard letter grade employed.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 23271 - Autism

This seminar discusses topics related to developmental disabilities, with a special emphasis on pervasive developmental disorders and autism. Issues regarding their definition, etiology, and treatment are also discussed. (Must have access to own transportation)
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 23272 - Applied Behavioral Analysis

Applied behavior analysis is a field of inquiry that investigates the factors that influence human behavior and uses this knowledge to develop effective educational and therapeutic programs. This course will introduce the students to concepts, techniques, and methodology associated with this field. Students will observe ABA programs being used in home settings to teach children with autism and then have the opportunity to design and implement such programs with this same population. The course is especially recommended for students interested in developmental psychology, clinical psychology, and special education.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 23852 - Social Concerns Seminar: L'Arche Communities

This seminar centers around travel to a L'Arche community (e.g., Toronto, Canada) to share community life with developmentally challenged persons. Students draw from the philosophy of Jean Vanier, the works of theologian Henri Nouwen, and other spiritual writings to augment this participatory learning experience.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 23855 - Social Concerns Seminar: Take Ten

Ten is a research-based violence prevention program and curriculum designed at the Robinson Community Learning Center. Volunteers work on a weekly basis with schoolchildren of all grades to teach them the skills needed to resolve conflict peacefully. Take Ten's mission is to provide youth with positive alternatives to violence and build their capacity to make more informed choices when faced with conflict. Students participating in the Take Ten seminar will serve as Take Ten volunteers during the semester (February through April with training in January), being part of a team that works at a school in the area one time per week. Additionally, the readings and reflections will allow students to focus on understanding issues of youth and violence from various perspectives. Contact: Ellen Kyes at epaul@nd.edu. Approval required. Apply at Robinson Community Learning Center.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 24800 - Introduction to Scientific Research

Taught at a host institution. SCI 30010 Introduction to Scientific Research at UCD; This module introduces students to the principles of scientific research through attachment to an active research group in the College of Science. Students will become active members of a research group and work under the direction of the group¿s Principal Investigator. Students will learn about the research focus of the group and conduct independent research into the scientific literature of relevance to the group¿s activity. They will shadow a member of the research team in the laboratory and master one basic and one advanced laboratory skill. Based on the research activity of the research group, students will learn about developing a research hypothesis and designing experiments to test the hypothesis. Using data generated by themselves and/or the group, students will learn how to analyze the research data and, where appropriate, how to determine whether the differences between control and test data are significantly different from each other. Students will also learn how to write a scientific abstract and a scientific report as well how to make a scientific presentation.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 24801 - Research Lab

Independent research carried out under supervision of a faculty member. A typewritten report of a research literature or an experimental study is required.
1.000 Credit hours
0.000 Lecture hours
1.000 Lab hours

PSY 25270 - Practicum in Developmental Disabilities

This practicum/seminar is the logical outgrowth of a long informal relationship that student volunteers have had with families in the Michiana community who have autistic and other special-needs children. The practicum aspect of the course will involve students going into a family home and working in a structured program with an autistic child for, on average, three times a week and a total of six to seven hours. In addition, students will meet in class once a week for discussion on a range of topics relating to autism, including issues regarding its definition, assessment, etiology, and treatment, as well as topics regarding the impact of autism on the family, community resources, and social policy. A number of classes will feature discussions led by parents of autistic children. This class is recommended particularly for students interested in child clinical psychology, education, developmental psychology, and social work.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 26800 - Directed Readings

Directed reading is carried out under the supervision of a faculty member. A typewritten report on the reading is required.
1.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 10.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 27800 - Research Lab

Independent research carried out under supervision of a faculty member. A typewritten report of a research literature or an experimental study is required.
1.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 Lecture hours
1.000 TO 4.000 Lab hours

PSY 30100 - Experimental Psychology I: Statistics

An introduction to the analysis and evaluation of experimental data, with particular emphasis on measures of central tendency, variability, and covariability and their relationship to psychological theory and explanation.
4.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30105 - Exploratory and Graphical Data Analysis

The process by which Psychological knowledge advances involves a cycle of theory development, experimental design and hypothesis testing. But after the hypothesis test either does or doesn't reject a null hypothesis, where does the idea for the next experiment come from? Exploratory data analysis completes this research cycle by helping to form and change new theories. After the planned hypothesis testing for an experiment has finished, exploratory data analysis can look for patterns in these data that may have been missed by the original hypothesis tests. A second use of exploratory data analysis is in diagnostics for hypothesis tests. There are many reasons why a hypothesis test might fail. There are even times when a hypothesis test will reject the null for an unexpected reason. By becoming familiar with data through exploratory methods, the informed researcher can understand what went wrong (or what went right for the wrong reason). This class is recommended for advanced students who are interested in getting the most from their data.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30160 - Experimental Psychology II: Methods

A continuation of Psychology 30100, with emphasis on the design and methods of execution of psychological research. Training in writing reports in professional format is also provided.
4.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30200 - Developmental Psychology

Major theories and research findings on social, emotional, and cognitive development are covered. Although emphasis is on the time from birth to early adulthood, some research on adulthood and the elderly is included. Attention is given to how different environments enhance or hinder healthy development.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30220 - Adolescent Development

The second decade of life is a crucial developmental transition that poses significant physical, psychological and social challenges to young people; and which have implications for later psychosocial outcomes. This course explores the portrait of adolescence that is revealed by contemporary developmental science. We will examine adolescence in cultural and historical context and survey recent empirical literatures on some core topics, including pubertal maturation, the cognitive and social-personality development of teenagers, the struggle for self and identity, the influence of family, peers and schools on development, adolescent risk behavior and positive youth development, among other topics
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30250 - Cognitive Development

The focus of this course is on developmental changes in human cognition, such as perception, action, learning and memory, reasoning and problem solving, and language acquisition. The focus will be on early development (prenatal to 4-5 years) because this is the period of most dramatic change, although it will include some discussion of implications for later development. The goal of this course is to provide students with basic empirical facts of human cognitive development, as well as to ground them in broader theoretical issues, such as questions of what development means, and the central controversies in the study of cognitive development.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30253 - How Children think: An Introduction to Cognitive Development

How do infants and children perceive, remember, and learn about their world? This course will cover developmental changes in human cognition, such as perception, action, learning and memory, reasoning and problem solving, and language acquisition. The focus will be on early development (prenatal to 4-5 years) because this is the period of most dramatic change, although it will include some discussion of development during later childhood and adolescence. The goal of this course is to provide students with basic empirical facts of human cognitive development, as well as to ground them in broader theoretical issues, such as questions of what development means, and the central controversies in the study of cognitive development. An additional goal is to help students to be responsible consumers of psychology research.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30272 - Neurodevelopmental Disorders

The past two decades have seen a dramatic increase in the prevalence of neurodevelopmental disorders. This course will be a critical examination of the etiology, neurobiology, diagnosis, and treatment of developmental and learning disabilities. We will also investigate the impact of a developmental disability on the individual, family, community, and culture. Topics will include (but are not limited to) ADHD, Asperger syndrome, Autism, Down syndrome, Dyslexia, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, PKU, and Willams syndrome.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30300 - Psychology of Personality

This course is a survey of the contemporary study of personality in the context of its growth as a field of psychology. The focus is on personality as an empirical science. The course introduces perspectives or approaches to studying personality as well as theories, historical background, and modern research. Additionally, key issues such as the conceptualization and measurement of personality variables, the stability and consistency of personality, and real world applications are addressed. The course provides the opportunity to broaden student's understanding of the science of personality and to think critically about the application of personality theory in everyday life. Readings are primarily taken from a text, but additional readings and class materials may be assigned.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30310 - Abnormal Psychology

Defines the concept of abnormal or maladaptive behavior; reviews the principles involved in human development and adjustment and describes the common clinical syndromes, their causes, and treatments.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30314 - Introduction to Clinical Psychology

This course provides an introduction to clinical psychology. The emphasis will be on clinical research and empirically-based practices. It will cover (a) research methods for studying clinical phenomena (b) key issues and controversies in the field, and (c) specific topics such as classification and diagnosis, assessment, prevention, and intervention.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30400 - Cognitive Psychology

A lecture course presenting a cognitive approach to higher processes such as memory, problem solving, learning, concept formation, and language.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30430 - Learning and Memory

A survey of the theories and methods relating to basic processes in learning and memory from both biological and cognitive perspectives.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30440 - Sensation and Perception

Includes a diverse range of topics, from sensory processes and perceptual development to sensory deprivation and visual illusions. Emphasis is on auditory and visual perception.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30510 - Behavioral Genetics

Behavioral genetics is the study of genetic and environmental influence on individual differences, and can be used to examine all aspects of development. The purpose of the class is threefold: first, to orient students to the basic genetic principles necessary for the understanding of hereditary influences on development; secondly, to overview genetic and environmental influence on behavioral, biomedical, and bio-behavioral attributes; and, lastly, to assist students to realize that behavioral genetics is a powerful tool for the study of environmental as well as genetic influences on development.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30520 - Introduction to Cognitive Neuroscience

An "Introduction to Cognitive Neuroscience" is a survey course that introduces students to the biological substrates underlying various forms of cognition in humans, with a specific focus on mental processes. We will explore how psychological and cognitive functions are produced by the brain. Cognitive neuroscience is a branch of both psychology and neuroscience, drawing from disciplines such as biological psychology (biopsychology), neuroscience, cognitive psychology, and neuropsychology. We will cover a broad range of topics, including learning and memory, perception, development and neural plasticity, cerebral lateralization and language, emotions and social cognition, stress, sleep and dreaming, and consciousness. No previous coursework in neuroscience is required, but at least some experience with biology or biopsychology is preferred.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30600 - Social Psychology

An introduction to the major theoretical orientations within the field of experimental social psychology and a survey of the research findings in selected areas such as attitude formation and change, affiliation, interpersonal attraction, and social cognition.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30633 - Youth and Political Violence

This course will examine how youth are affected by political violence and war, with a focus on stress and coping in violent and post-war contexts. We will discuss major theories and recent research in developmental, social, and political psychology on these issues. The course will emphasize resilience processes, that is, identifying risk and protective factors that can explain why and how political conflict affects youth, with a focus on real-world application. Case studies and interdisciplinary readings from sociology, anthropology, literature, and political science will also be incorporated into the readings, lectures, class discussion, and writing assignments. Students will be encouraged to consult the existing empirical literature to suggest ways to (a) protect youth mental health on an individual level, and (b) decrease the potential for inter-group violence and promote constructive peacebuilding on a societal level.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30634 - Psychology of Peace

This course will provide an overview of the growing field of peace psychology, which seeks to apply psychological theory in order to better understand patterns of violence and nonviolence, identify effective conflict resolution techniques, and promote human dignity. The course will be divided into three primary domains: (1) psychological causes/effects of violence, (2) psychological causes/effects of nonviolence, and (3) conflict resolution, psychosocial interventions, and peacebuilding. Within each of these domains, we will discuss multiple levels of understanding (e.g., interpersonal, community, structural) and will draw direct connections to international conflict settings through the use of case studies, film, and supplemental readings.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 30676 - Programming for Video Game Development

The purpose of this course is to provide students with experience in various aspects of programming for video game development. No prior programming experience is necessary and students will proceed at their own pace. In addition to several programming projects that utilize gaming APIs or frameworks, students will also be exposed to level design (map creation), 3D construction techniques, custom textures, sound design, and lighting effects. 3D game development will utilize the Hammer Editor, part of the Half-Life 2 video game modding Software Development Kit (Source SDK) and its associated tools. Additional third-party (and often free) utilities will also be necessary. Students will work on their own or in teams on a final project agreed upon with the instructor. Students will need to provide their own Windows compatible computer or laptop or a Mac running windows under BootCamp.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 31672 - Practicum in Robotics

This course will allow students to work with the Nao humanoid robot platform. Students will learn about how to control the sensory and motor capabilities of the robot to produce specific sequences of robot behaviors and/or to allow the robot to respond to particular inputs from the external environment. Students will work with the instructor to identify the specific behaviors and response sequences to be created.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 33231 - Geriatric Neuropsychology

Cognitive disorders are escalating rapidly as the baby boomer generation ages. This course will provide an introduction to the clinical neuropsychology of normal and pathological aging. Common cognitive disorders among older adults will be contrasted to normal aging, including cerebrovascular diseases (such a stroke), Alzheimer¿s disease, and other dementias. Case studies will be presented to illustrate the link between cognitive impairment and challenges experienced by patients from a variety of cultural backgrounds. Students will gain an appreciation for local and national resources that can provide support to individuals with cognitive disorders and their caregivers.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 33643 - Using Research to Help Children Learn

Students who wish to integrate theory, practice, and empirical evidence in children's learning may choose to participate in a seminar that combines community based service-learning and research. Students will meet 75 minutes per week on campus to discuss a set of common readings covering topics including service learning, mentoring, children¿s learning and development, and research methods. In addition, students will be required to commit to spending at least two hours per week (one hour each on two weekday afternoons [M/W or T/R] for a total of approximately 25 hours) working with an elementary school child one-on-one in a local after-school literacy program. Students will keep a journal with entries for each visit with their child, and they will conduct research that involves the comparison among instructional techniques, materials, or behavioral management methods. Students will be required to integrate the theory and evidence from course material with their service experience and research findings. This seminar is only offered in the fall; however, students will be encouraged to continue their service to the after-school program during the spring semester through a 1-credit ESS service-learning option. *Please note: students may be required to provide their own transportation to/from the after-school program site. Every effort will be made to arrange transportation or to include sites that are within walking distance of campus.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 33651 - Educational effectiveness: Examining influences on students achievement

The class is designed to examine the factors affecting student achievement. It begins with students¿ influences on their own development (motivation, intelligence, efficacy) and works outward to the effects of families (SES, parenting practices, etc.), teachers (instruction, training, experience, content knowledge), and schools (what do effective schools look like?), examining whether and how each shape students¿ academic trajectories. We may also look at peer and neighborhood effects. The last part of the course considers programs designed for students, families, teachers, and schools in order to improve achievement. Throughout, the course will address issues of equity, considering whether and how policy-makers and educators can design programs to close the achievement gap.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 33685 - Social Factors and Sustainability: Effects of the Built Environment on Health and Well-Being

This course focuses on the interaction between people and the physical environment on human health, well-being, behavior, and sustainability. Social and physical factors across multiple scales ¿ from specific environments (residential, educational, work, healthcare, and commercial), urban and natural settings, to the planet - are explored. Issues of public health, environmental justice, universal design, and culture are included throughout. Lecture and discussion class with hands-on assignments and quizzes. Upper level undergraduate and graduate students from across the University and especially in architecture, the sustainability minor, design, pre-professional studies, social sciences, and business are encouraged to enroll.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 33686 - Introduction to Performance Management in Business

This introductory course will examine the principles, methods, and selected applications of performance management in business settings. Like Industrial and Organizational Psychology (IOP), performance management approaches share the common goal of improving corporate or organizational success, but they rely on established behavioral techniques and direct interventions, rather than the more diverse and eclectic methods characteristic of IOP. The field of Organizational Behavior Management (OBM) is the leading area of application for performance management techniques in business and organizational settings. Students will read an acclaimed text in the field, along with original research and methodological articles published in the OBM area. The course will involve three exams, including the final, and possibly a final project.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 33691 - Rethinking Crime and Justice: Explorations from the Inside Out

What are the causes and costs of criminal behavior? How are people and communities affected by incarceration? How can we make our criminal justice system as good as it can be for all stakeholders? This course brings together students from both sides of the prison wall to explore issues including why people commit crime, what prisons are for, realities of prison life and reentry, effects of victimization, and restorative justice perspectives. This course follows the Inside-Out model of prison exchange now well established across the United States. It provides an opportunity for "inside students" (at the Westville Correctional Facility) and "outside students" (from Notre Dame) to learn with and from each other and to break new ground together. Notre Dame students travel to Westville each week of the semester for dialogue with students at the facility, who have read the same relevant texts. Together they examine myths and realities related to crime and to punishment, explore the effects of criminal justice policy, and develop ideas for responding more effectively to crime in our communities.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 33694 - Cybercrime and the Law

Almost all crimes, or even human interactions, contain a digital component. The fact that "old" laws don't always fit "new" problems is no more apparent than in the area of cybercrimes. This course will include discussion of topics including: the methodology of typical cyber investigations, the application of the Fourth Amendment to digital evidence, and different types of cyber-specific laws enforced today. The course will also focus on the responses of both courts and legislators to the ever-evolving issues presented by computer crimes.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34637 - Identity, Culture, & Globaliization

This course will provide students with a basic overview of the social psychological principles that describe and explain the development and functions of the self and identity. This overview will include concepts such as self, identity formation, identity development and principles of social influence that shape social behavior. The purpose of this overview is to provide students with a social psychological perspective that will then facilitate a critical reading of the topics dealing with globalization, identity, violence, and multiculturalism. This course is intended as a mid-level reading-writing-discussion course in which students will be expected to keep a journal chronicling their experience of and reactions to class discussions as well as their reactions to their broader experience of their experiences outside of the classroom.
3.000 Credit hours
12.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34660 - Developmental Psychology

Follows the development of the child through adolescence with emphasis on the complexity and continuity of psychological development The course will emphasize the interaction and interdependence of the various systems: biological, genetic and environmental, as well as the interaction and interdependence of cognitive and social factors in the various stages of development from the prenatal period through adolescence. Particular attention will be placed on attachment theory, the development of the self and possible pathological outcomes of faulty development. Prerequisite: PS 101.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

 

 

PSY 30300 International Psychology at UCD; International psychology examines the theory and practice of psychology around the world. It is a relatively new branch of psychology, having been established in the United States in the 1990's. An important step in this regard was the recognition by the American Psychological Association of a new Division for International Psychology (Division 52) in 1997. Since then, a "Handbook of International Psychology" (2004) has appeared, along with related literature such as "Towards a Global Psychology" (2007). The study of international psychology includes the geographical dispersion of psychology, characteristics of psychology in individual countries and the international organizations that exist to promote psychology. We will also look at the claims by psychologists in Asia, Africa and Latin America that 'western psychology' has cultural limitations and the various alternatives that have been proposed.

3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34680 - Psychology of Work

The unit is an eclectic combining of the theoretical and the practical in examining the roles of individuals as members of organizations. Through lectures, workshops, case studies and a workplace-oriented assignment, students will be challenged to develop new paradigms of thinking about the psychology of the individual in the workplace. The Psychology of Work is a blend of organizational behaviour, sociology, organizational theory, management, leadership, human resource issues and psychology. It examines contemporary management thinking in the context of cause-and-effect on individuals and subsequent performance and encourages dialectic about organizations as rational decision making bodies. Where appropriate, guest speakers will be invited to talk about current workplace and people issues that they experience as managers and leaders. The teaching approach is one of active learning and students are required to participate fully in the blend of workshops and lectures throughout the unit. I believe that learning should also be a pleasant experience and a sense of humor is most welcome if not mandatory.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34681 - Human Factors

Taught at Trinity College in Dublin, Ireland as PS 3407 'Human Factors' The subject area of human factors is in part concerned with human performance limitations and the origins of performance variability. Applications of human factors to the workplace and to highway and aviation safety will be emphasized. Implications for th
3.500 Credit hours
3.500 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34682 - Organizational Psychology

Taught at Trinity College in Dublin, Ireland as PS 3406 'Organizational Psychology' This course provides an introduction to core theoretical areas in the psychology of work and organizations. It deals with organizations as systems and cultures as well as with how people function within organizations (as leaders, team-workers etc.). In pa
3.500 Credit hours
3.500 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

 

 

Taught as PSYC 1102 "Psychology: Behaviour in Context" at host institution. This unit introduces students to the broad scope of psychology, with a particular emphasis on developmental, social psychology and interpersonal communication, intelligence and personality, and abnormal psychology. The unit provides an overview of these central topics and the links between them. It is taught through a co-coordinated series of lectures and laboratory tutorials.

3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

 

 

PSY 20150 at UCD; This course will provide an introduction to the history of psychology. The main text for the course is Graham Richards', "Putting Psychology in Its Place" (2010). This will occasionally be supplemented by other material. Major emphasis will be placed throughout the course on understanding psychology in relation to its social context. The role that psychology has played, and continues to play, in society will often be examined in a critical light.

3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34692 - Evolutionary and Comparative Psychology

Taught as PS 3036 Evolutionary and Comparative Psychology at St. Andrews University. This module will address evolutionary and comparative approaches to psychology. The aim is to provide an understanding of major evolutionary forces and how they have shaped animal and human behaviour and psychology. Key principles, concepts and methodologies will be introduced and related to specific topic areas such as the evolution of social behaviour and the evolutionary origins of language and cognition.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

 

 

Taught as PSY 30080 "Psychology and Crime" at host institution. This module examines the overlap between theories and research within criminology and within psychology in order to examine the concept of crime from an inter-disciplinary perspective. Rather than being a course in Forensic Psychology, it offers a critique of the potential of such an approach. Gender disparities in offending, the efficacy of drug criminalization, and psychological aspects of the criminal justice system such as eyewitness testimony and jury decision-making are covered, as are sensitive topics, such as recidivism among child sex offenders and intervention with offenders.

3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 34698 - Culture and Psychology

This unit will introduce students to the debates and issues underlying the field of Cross-Cultural, Indigenous and Cultural Psychology to understand diverse conceptions about the role of culture and its implication for professional practice. To promote cultural competence in the Australian context, distinctions between migrant issues and Indigenous issues will be explored. A diversity of psychological theoretical frameworks and methods will guide more appropriate responses to deal with racism and oppression. Alternative paths, which enhance and empower cultural identity and wellbeing, will be pursued to address the broader issues of social justice. The role of culture, worldview, and other contextual factors in shaping our realities, and subsequently our adaptations to societal contexts, will be considered. A major aim of the course is to support conscientization (Freire, 1970, 1972) about the role of self in promoting culturally competent practice in diverse contexts.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 40305 - Difficult Personalities

This course is about personality disorder (PD), a form of psychological disorder thought to develop from the interaction of persons' genetic makeup and their childhood/adolescent experiences. The course will cover the different ways that PD is conceptualized and how research is changing these conceptualizations; the possible causes of PD; how PD is measured, diagnosed, and treated PD; and how PD relates to other kinds of psychopathology.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 40306 - Personality and Individual Differences

This course surveys major theoretical and empirical issues in the contemporary research literature regarding personality traits and other important dimensions of individual differences (including intelligence). Covered topics typically include the consistency and temporal stability of behavior, the influence of heredity and environment in personality and intellectual development, the nature and organization of traits, accuracy and bias in person perception, and the role of personality in interpersonal attraction. We also examine how personality is related to a diverse range of outcomes, including occupational success and job satisfaction, happiness and life satisfaction, health and lifestyle variables, and various forms of psychopathology.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 40655 - Cognitive Development

This course provides an introduction to the central issues in the field of cognitive development. It will cover (a) general frameworks for studying cognitive development, (b) key questions in the field, and (c) specific topics such as conceptual development, memory development, language development, and the development of mathematical understanding. The primary focus will be on cognitive development from infancy to adolescence. Students will be expected to synthesize and evaluate material presented in lectures, readings, and class discussions.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 40669 - Anthropology of Childhood and Education

Concepts of human growth vary extraordinarily across time and space. When children become full-fledged persons, when they can reason, when or whether they should be independent from their parents, and how all this happens are variable and illuminating. Education - either formal or informal - reflects and also constitutes a society's view of childhood. This course provides a (selective) cross-cultural survey of childhood and education, looking at stages from pregnancy and infancy to late adolescence. Students will devise and conduct projects of their own.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 40677 - Digital Analysis and Forensic Psychology of Cybercrime

The use and interaction with digital devices is a part of daily life. This course will introduce students to the principles of forensic psychology as they apply to cybercrime offenses along with the field of computer forensics techniques and methodologies. Topics to be covered include the motivations of hackers, online child offenders, cyber stalkers, and identity thieves along with electronic discovery, Windows forensic analysis procedures, and Macintosh forensic analysis procedures.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 41280 - Family Research Methods

The primary goal of this course is to provide you the opportunity to receive advanced training in family research methods by working closely with faculty, professional staff, graduate students, and advanced undergraduate students. You will learn about both a) the substantive areas of developmental psychology, family functioning, and the effects of family processing on children, and b) conducting research and various aspects of running a major research project concerning families and children. Our class periods and time outside of class will provide direct and hands-on experience with all phases of conducting major research projects on children and families, including topics such as marital conflict, parental depression, community violence and children, applied projects for educating parents about family processes based on research, and other topics. Our goals are that by the end of the course, you will: 1) Have advanced understanding of the methods and approaches used in research on families and children. 2) Have practical knowledge about the methods for conducting this research. 3) Be knowledgeable about the major theories that form the basis of this research. 4) Be knowledgeable about the findings and empirical research on family relationships and children. 5) Be able to critique the literature and be able to identify possible directions for future research.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43220 - Adolescent Development

Focuses on adolescent development within various social contexts, including family, peer groups, and the workplace. Special emphasis on normative development at the transition from childhood to adolescence.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43230 - Mental Health and Aging

The primary purpose of this course is to expose students to basic issues relevant to the mental health of the elderly, which includes an experiential learning component in the form of volunteer relationships with an older adult. In the classroom, students will be challenged to think critically about the mental health issues associated with later life and are expected to actively participate in class discussions. Topics focused on pathological aging include psychological disorders, assessment, diagnosis, and treatment; resiliency in aging topics include: physical and mental health, social support, personality, coping, and stress. Class presentations, volunteer activities, and the readings will be used to stimulate discussion and critical thinking. Students will also keep a journal for this purpose. The format of the course may include some lecture, but will rely heavily on class discussion and group activities. Students are required to participate in some type of volunteer activity over the course of the semester (i.e., a minimum of one hour/week). Students may generate their own volunteer placement or I can help match you up with one.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43240 - Moral Development

Students are challenged to think about the nature of moral development, learn how to examine and compare theories in moral development, develop critical thinking and have the opportunity to create a study of moral development. The course reflects on Catholic Social Teaching and its relation to moral identity and social action generally and in our own lives.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43246 - Self, Ego, & Identity

This seminar examines the major theoretical traditions that help us understand what it means to be a person. Particular emphasis is placed on developmental processes and recent empirical findings.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43247 - Leadership and Social Change

This course actively explores means to promote positive social change and the common good. How do leaders foster a sense of human potential, moral imagination, and common purpose? What new models of learning, organization, and collaboration may contribute to efforts to address social challenges such as income inequality, youth at risk, environmental change, and political/global divisions? What can we learn from Catholic social tradition and research on ethical development to work toward a just word? Such questions will form the basis of our dialogue and research together. The course is interdisciplinary and draws student leaders from various student organizations. Readings from multiple perspectives are discussed in a seminar format, complemented by independent student research and experiential learning opportunities. Central themes include skill building to respond to social concerns, unleashing creativity and innovation for change, and a focus on solutions and what works. Throughout, the course provides means for students to reflect on their own development and purpose. In the fall of 2014, students will also be offered the opportunity to contribute to the creation of a future fellowship/certificate program at Notre Dame that will integrate leadership development and social innovation. Contact instructors for entry.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43250 - Cognitive Development

Major theories in cognitive development and data relevant to those theories are reviewed. Mechanisms that might account for observed developmental changes across the life span (e.g., processing speed) are discussed.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43251 - Language Development

This seminar will focus on research and theories addressing a fundamental scientific question: How do humans learn language? Readings and discussions will focus on contemporary research, as well as some classic studies, investigating how children learn about the sounds, meanings, and syntactic structures of their native language. The focus will be on mechanisms of development - not simply what infants and children learn at a given age, but how they learn, including hotly contested debates over this process. The primary focus will be the acquisition of a first language by typically-developing infants and children, but we will also examine factors relating to variability in this processes, such as socio-economic status and developmental disorders.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43254 - Developing Minds

In this course, students will learn some of the ways cognition changes with age, experience, and education. Cognition in this course is defined broadly and includes, but is not limited to, basic processes such as memory, knowledge of subjects taught in school (e.g., reading and arithmetic), and thoughts about one's self as a learner (e.g., perceived self-competence). The age range covered is from birth to old age. Two fundamental questions addressed throughout the course are: What cognitive abilities do individuals of different ages bring to learning environments? And how do learning environments affect individuals' thinking?
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43271 - Autism

This seminar discusses topics related to developmental disabilities, with a special emphasis on pervasive developmental disorders and autism. Issues regarding their definition, etiology, and treatment are also discussed. (Must have access to own transportation)
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43272 - Applied Behavioral Analysis

Applied behavior analysis is a field of inquiry that investigates the factors that influence human behavior and uses this knowledge to develop effective educational and therapeutic programs. This course will introduce the students to concepts, techniques, and methodology associated with this field. Students will observe ABA programs being used in home settings to teach children with autism and then have the opportunity to design and implement such programs with this same population. The course is especially recommended for students interested in developmental psychology, clinical psychology, and special education.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43282 - Developmental Psychopathology

This course articulates principles for a lifespan perspective on the origins and development of individual patterns of adaption and maladaption.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43288 - Practicum in Child Maltreatment

This course is intended to expose students to the child welfare system and the effects of child maltreatment and foster care on child development. The seminar portion of the course will include training on mandated reporting, and the child welfare system, and discussion of current research on child maltreatment, foster care, child development, and developmental psychopathology. The practicum portion of the course is designed to give students hands on experience with children in custody of the Department of Child Services in South Bend. Each student in the practicum will be paired with a child who is currently placed in foster care because of substantiated child maltreatment. The student will serve as a mentor to this child, and will spend 1-2 hours with the child twice weekly in the child's foster home.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

 

 

This course emphasizes the use of critical thinking skills for distinguishing science from pseudoscience in psychology. Picking up where Introduction to Clinical Psychology (PSY 30314) left off, this course takes up the torch of Popper, Meehl, and Lakatos to cover topics such as: (a) controversial therapeutic, assessment and diagnostic techniques, (b) weak theories , and (c) myths from "pop" psychology and every day life.

3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43318 - Stress, Disorder, and Disease

There is considerable scientific interest in the concept of stress and its implications for health and well-being. This seminar will cover (1) original articles on the concepts and definitions of stress; (2) original articles on methods for assessing life stress; and (3) the animal and human research literatures on stress effects on biological and psychological functioning. Particular attention will be paid to the implications of these ideas and literatures for understanding psychological disorders, especially major depression, as well as physical illnesses.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43334 - Intervention Science

This course is designed to examine current questions and methods in intervention research with specific focus on cognitive behavior therapy and its variants. We will be approaching the field from several vantage points including 1) the methods needed to address questions regarding the evaluation of the efficacy and effectiveness of interventions; 2) the often uneasy alliance between science and practice, 3) the promise and challenge of technology transfer, that is the dissemination and implementation of "therapies that work" By the end of the term, students will have gained knowledge of the questions in intervention science, the methods used to address these questions and how these questions and methods may help to reduce the burden of major forms of psychopathology.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43344 - Immigrant Families and Mental Health

This course examines major psychological topics relevant to immigrant families in the U.S. and factors influencing their mental health. Given that one out of five youths in the American public school system is a child of immigrants, it is critical to study this rapidly growing population especially for those interested in working with youths and their families. Broad areas to be covered include cultural adaptation processes (e.g., acculturation), biculturalism, identity development, family processes, academic achievement, and mental health as well as implications for culturally competent mental health treatment and service delivery.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43360 - Health Psychology

Because behavior plays a significant role in people's health, psychology has emerged as an important contributor to the process of coping with disease, disease prevention, and health enhancement. This course is designed to be an overview of health psychology and behavioral medicine. Topics will include psychology and medicine, health psychology models, stress and health, adaptation to illness, psychological aspects of cancer, pain, coronary artery disease, rehabilitation, infectious disease, health promotion and disease prevention, and professional opportunities in health psychology. In addition, health care professionals in the community who are working in areas to be covered in the course will be making presentations to the class. There will be two exams that will cover reading and lecture material. In addition, there will be two short papers that will help integrate the readings, lectures, and information provided by the speakers. Finally, there will be a lengthy paper that will consist of a summary review and critique of research in a specific area of health psychology.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43362 - Understanding Eating Disorders

In this seminar, we will explore the etiology and treatment of eating disorders. We first will examine biological, psychosocial, and cultural risk factors for the development of the various eating disorders. We then will discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the current diagnostic classification of these disorders as well as related pathologies. Finally, we will critically examine current prevention and treatment efforts, paying particular attention to their underlying theoretical assumptions and empirical evidence of their efficacy.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43364 - Social Inequities in Mental Health and Health Outcomes

This seminar will examine the problem of mental health and health disparities in the U.S. and possible solutions for addressing such inequities. Specifically, the course will explore how race, poverty, and other social conditions have contributed to a greater burden of unmet mental health needs and physical illness among ethnic minorities and other underserved populations, primarily using the lens of psychological theory and empirical research. Strategies for addressing these disparities will also be discussed, including an emphasis on improving access to, and quality of, mental health services and psychological interventions for ethnic minorities and other underserved populations in the U.S.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43365 - Sport Psychology

This course will focus on the application of psychological concepts and current research to the enhancement of performance in both sports and fitness activities. An emphasis will be placed on techniques and strategies that have been used effectively to maximize skill performance with an understanding that that many of the real-life behaviors evident in sport are transferable to other performance endeavors. Topics include overview of the field, motivation, personality factors, self-concept, team development, leadership, psychological skills training, and exercise adherence. Students will produce a "handbook" targeted for specific population of performers which will apply the concepts learned throughout the semester.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43434 - Visual Memory

Every day you leave your dorm room and head out across campus to attend class, work out, meet with friends, and participate in club activities. On these walks, you may stop to look at new and interesting sculptures, hallway displays, buildings, and landscapes that catch your attention. You probably see many of the same people and say hello as you pass. If campus construction blocks your normal route, you can easily find a new one, perhaps one that you have never taken before. You likely come home and tell your roommates about some of the events you witnessed on your walk. These experiences depend on your ability to store knowledge of your visual world in memory. Without such memory, you would be unable to recognize your friends and surroundings. You would be unable to notice changes in your environment. You would be unable to recount your own autobiographical experiences. In this course you will learn how memory for objects, scenes, faces, places, and emotion-inspiring events are created, how these memories are stored, and how we use visual memory to support our daily activities. In some sense, then, this course is about a walk through campus and students will become aware of the amazing, striking, and at times desperately limited nature of memory for our visually based experiences.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43451 - Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Attention deficit disorder (also known as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) is a diagnosis applied to children and adults who have experienced a handicap in their school, home, work, and/or social settings due to abnormal levels of distractibility, impulsively, and/or hyperactivity. According to epidemiological data, approximately 4% to 6% of the U.S. population has ADD, which makes it one of the most prevalent psychological disorders in contemporary society. Furthermore, it is currently believed that 66% of those diagnosed with ADD as children will continue to exhibit symptoms as adults. Over the past decade, there has been heated debate over both the cause and treatment of ADD. For instance, ADD has been attributed to a variety of causes including minor brain damage, poor diet, and poor parenting. Likewise, a variety of different treatment options have been recommended including medication, behavior therapy, and cognitive therapy; and recently, there has been concern expressed by the FDA that several medications used to treat ADD might be harmful to children. This seminar will provide a comprehensive survey of current research into the cause and treatment of ADD. In addition, the seminar will focus on the effects of this disorder from the perspective of both afflicted individuals and their families as well.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43455 - Seminar: Psycholinguistics

An interdisciplinary seminar with emphasis upon student participation covering topics such as linguistics, memory, and perception for language stimuli, child language, bilingualism, and social psychology of language.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43456 - Pragmatics of Language Usage

This seminar will survey research and theory in Pragmatics and Psycholinguistics concerning the communicative functions of language. Topics will include Searle's classification of speech acts, Grice's Maxims and the conversational implicatures, Sperber and Wilson's Relevance Theory, and Clark's theory of Language-as-an-Action.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43526 - Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience: The Sleeping Brain

This seminar will provide a broad introduction to the cognitive neuroscience of sleep. Topics covered will span human sleep disorders, sleep in various animals species (e.g. unihemispheric sleep in dolphins), learning and memory during sleep, sleep's role in creativity and insight, plasticity in the sleeping cortex, sleep and consciousness, and dreaming. We will also examine neuroimaging, neurophysiological, and behavioral approaches to the study of sleep, discussing critical questions such as "what is sleep?" and, "why do we sleep?"
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43531 - Psychology and Medicine

This course has two basic objectives. First, it examines from a lifespan and psychobiological perspective the factors that place individuals at different stages of life at risk for illness and assist them in maintaining their health. In addition, it addresses a variety of challenging psychological and social issues that physicians and other healthcare professionals must face in the practice of medicine. The course covers a range of topics dealing with health issues related to different stages of human development (childhood, adolescence, and adulthood), disabled populations, culture and gender, stress, physician-patient interactions, death and dying, professional ethics, and social policies relating to health care. The course is primarily intended for students intending to enter medical school. Most classes will involve brief formal presentations by the instructors and invited guests, followed by discussion of assigned readings pertinent to the day's topic. In addition, students will be exposed, via a limited practicum, to a variety of medical settings.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43625 - Self: Philosophy and Psychology

Who are you? What are you? What is the self? Does it even exist in reality in an absolute sense? What is the nature of social reality and our relationship with it? Social psychology provides some insights into these questions and issues and can inform our thinking and understanding of our selves and our world. Although the broader theoretical and philosophical context for this seminar is social psychological, we will have the opportunity to read about these topics from a variety of sources - psychological, philosophical, and theological.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43640 - Educational Psychology

Educational Psychology examines questions about development, learning and achievement in schools. In this course we will explore fundamental questions such as (a) What is intelligence? Is it fixed or changeable? What are the implications of conceptions of intelligence for achievement? (b) How does learning occur? What are the implications of different theories of learning? Is there a "correct" theory of learning? Does learning differ in different subject areas? (c) What motivates student learning? Can instruction be "motivational"? (d) What is "good" instruction? How do theories of learning relate to instructional practices? (e) How do aspects of school context, such as interaction with peers and teachers, and school culture, influence learning, motivation and achievement?
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 43641 - Motivation and Academic Learning

Traditional studies of learning have focused almost exclusively on cognitive, or "cold," processes. Recent research on learning illustrates how "hot" processes also influence thinking and academic learning. In this course, we focus on how social, motivational, and emotional influences interact with cognitive processes to affect academic learning. Social influences will include students' social goals in school, friendships, and family dynamics. Motivational influences are explored through the study of major theories of achievement motivation, including attribution, self-efficacy, intrinsic motivation, "possible selves," and goal theories. Emotional factors such as coping mechanisms, test anxiety, and wellbeing also are discussed. In addition, we explore how development affects students' social, motivational, and emotional responses to learning. Child, adolescent, and adult models are discussed, and applications to educational child settings will be an integral part of the course.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 47805 - NSF/REU Psych Research

This is a zero-credit course for students engaged in independent research or working with a faculty member of the University on a special project. No course work is required.
0.000 Credit hours
0.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

PSY 47809 - Senior Thesis

The Senior Thesis requires a year-long investigation on an original topic of study under the tutelage and mentorship of a faculty member. It must result in a substantial written product that will be evaluated by the thesis advisor. Any senior psychology major may undertake a Senior Thesis provided that the student is in good academic standing and has secured the approval of a faculty mentor. Faculty members may consider other academic qualifications as a condition for supervising a thesis, such as GPA, performance in certain courses, experience in a research lab, relevant background experience, favorable letters of reference and compatible scholarly interests.
3.000 Credit hours
0.000 Lecture hours
3.000 Lab hours

PSY 48800 - Senior Honors Thesis

These two seminars assist the senior major to propose, execute, and write an honors thesis. The first semester is devoted to the development and presentation of the proposal, and the second to its execution, write-up, and subsequent presentation.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours